First Territorial Legislature

This month in history — February 20, 1901 — the Territory of Hawaii’s first legislature met for the first time in Iolani Palace. During the first session in Honolulu, territory president Sanford B. Dole welcomed the newly elected representatives and senators. Afterward, the legislature was already considering a controversial issue: legalizing opium. Read more about it in the Hawaiian Gazette.

Hawaiian Gazette’s Coverage of the Hawaii Legislature’s Beginning
The Hawaiian gazette, February 21, 1896, Page 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1896-02-21/ed-1/seq-4/

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8 Comments on “First Territorial Legislature”

  1. I believe the headline is false and misleading in nature. The kingdom of Hawaiia had the very first legislative body in hawaii and most importantly the territory of hawaii legislature is nothing more then that same body its just and still being usurped buy todays police authority.

  2. This is not true. Hawaii already had a branch of legislation before the US invaded Hawaii and set up an illegal occupation for the next 123 years. We also had an executive and judicial branch of government.

    • hdnpC says:

      Thank you for your interest. The headline now reads “First TERRITORIAL Legislature”. Our blog describes what we find in the English-language newspapers of the time.

      • Hawaii never became a territory of the U.S., or even a State for that matter. There is no treaty of annexation. There was no consent given by the Hawaiian Kingdom to relinquish and lands, legislation, or independence, to America to become a territory. The current legislation today uses the Supreme court houses, police stations, and other legislative buildings that were built by the Hawaiian Kingdom – not by America. What you call historical, I call a historical insurrection and puppet government. We must show history in it’s proper light. This fake legislative territory, couldn’t get the a 2/3’s vote to make Hawai’i a part of the U.S.

        Think of it this way, Hawai’i was a country with over 140,000 people living in it since 1843. They had a constitutional monarchy and were a neutral country like Australia, with a government that they voted for. Why would any citizen consider this new government of 30 men parading in-front of the palace saying, “were the new lawful government”? “You didn’t vote for us, we are taking this over by fraud and force”. This is America because we say so.

        Hence the Ku’e petitions were 95% of every Hawaiian alive signed their names to protest the illegal annexation of Hawai’i stomping out any hope for a legal treaty between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Hawai’i.

        Quick question for the author. Did you consider a perspective of this history from a Hawaiian perspective? Anytime you mention Hawai’i… historically in the future I would advise you have to ask permission from a Kanaka who represent the suffrage. Do not walk infront of us and tell us what happen in history. Walk beside us. If we say its not our history, respect that. This is not my history. Most of the History we learn about Hawai’i has been infused with indoctrination and political propaganda, to trick the masses in believing something so unamerican as invading a friendly nation was o.k. – but it wasn’t. Not then or now.

        Something that was not done with the vote for statehood in 1959 was to ask the suffrage the Hawaiian citizens at the time and only the Hawaiian citizens, not the American transplants who flooded the vote if they wanted to become independent or if they wanted to become a territory. That did not happen and is a direct violation of the UN Charter.

      • hdnpC says:

        For an alternative perspective in newspapers of the same time period please refer to ULUKAU: HAWAIIAN ELECTRONIC LIBRARY
        Hoʻolaupaʻi He ʻOhina Nūpepa ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi
        http://nupepa.org/gsdl2.5/cgi-bin/nupepa?e=p-0nupepa–00-0-0–010—4—–text—0-1l–1en-Zz-1—20-about—0003-1-0000utfZz-8-00&cl=&d=&l=haw

        Thank you for your interest in our blog about the English-language newspapers published between 1836 and 1922 that have been digitized via the Library of Congress Chronicling America/National Digital Newspaper Project.

      • The head line should read in all fairness. Puppet legislation, of illegal U.S. occupation. It didn’t just happen in Hawai’i. The Philippines was invaded and occupied too. Japan, and lots of other islands in the pacific. U.S. expansionism began in Hawai’i in 1893… and made its way to Iraq and Syria in our day and age. Its the sad but true reality behind U.S. leglisation and territories outside of the U.S.

        In the words of Mark Twain. “I am an anti-imperialist, I am opposed to having the eagle put it’s talons on another land.”

      • hdnpC says:

        The headline as it was reported is what we posted about but thanks to all for the lively commentary. We appreciate your interest.


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