Becoming the Territory of Hawaii

Today in history — June 14, 1900 — The Republic of Hawaii became the Territory of Hawaii. The president of the Republic of Hawaii, Sanford B. Dole just became the first territorial governor of Hawaii under the United States.

At the ceremony, at least 2,500 people gathered around Iolani Palace, which was bedecked by American flags over Hawaiian flags, and special guests sat on the two-story palace’s balconies. Reportedly, the audience included members of all ethnic groups and “[as many Native Hawaiians] as Haoles.”

During the ceremony, Rev. Enoka Semaia Timoteo delivered a Hawaiian prayer, Dole swore to the oath of office and signed it, and delivered his inaugural speech, and an excerpt is as follows:

“The United States–always the protector of Hawaii–has approached the question of annexation in the most considerate manner. With great deliberation has our request been acceded to and finally consummated with a regard for our … interests that we can never forget.”

After his speech, The Royal Hawaiian Band performed the Star Spangled Banner, the U.S. national anthem, and soldiers marched away.

Read more about it in “Hawaii Joins the Sisterhood of States and Territories Amid a Blaze.”

“Hawaii Joins the Sisterhood of States and Territories Amid a Blaze”
Hawaiian gazette, June 15, 1900, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1900-06-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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6 Comments on “Becoming the Territory of Hawaii”

  1. This is a big lie. They called it the “Territory” which is a misnomer since, there was no treaty annexing the territory to the United States. To this day, it remains the territory of the Hawaiian Kingdom, occupied by the United States. A joint resolution, passed by a majority vote of two houses rather than two countries, is domestic legislation of the United States that is incapable of unilaterally annexing a foreign country such as the Hawaiian Islands.

    • hdnpC says:

      Thank you for your interest. The Hawaii Digital Newspaper project of the University of Hawaii at Manoa is a part of the (U.S.) National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supported program to digitize *English-language* newspapers published between the years of 1880 and 1922. Our goal is to make primary research materials available for study. These sources do depict beliefs and perspectives of previous eras. Our blog highlights the news as it was presented in the times it was created so that researchers have an opportunity to analyze the historical context. Alternative news reporting may be found in Hoʻolaupaʻi Hawaiian Nūpepa Collection http://nupepa.org/gsdl2.5/cgi-bin/nupepa?l=en

  2. This is a big lie. They called it the “Territory” which is a misnomer since, there was no treaty annexing the territory to the United States. To this day, it remains the territory of the Hawaiian Kingdom, occupied by the United States. A joint resolution, passed by a majority vote of two houses rather than a two-thirds vote of two countries, is domestic legislation of the United States that is incapable of unilaterally annexing a foreign country such as the Hawaiian Islands. The so-called “Territory of Hawaii” is make-believe.

  3. This article is full of misinformation. How can a joint resolution constitutionally acquire another country? Can municipal laws take another country? If a country lacks the need for a treaty what is to stop any country from drafting their own laws, in their own legislations to acquire any country they please?

    • hdnpC says:

      Thank you for your interest. The Hawaii Digital Newspaper project of the University of Hawaii at Manoa is a part of the (U.S.) National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supported program to digitize *English-language* newspapers published between the years of 1880 and 1922. Our goal is to make primary research materials available for study. These sources do depict beliefs and perspectives of previous eras. Our blog highlights the news as it was presented in the times it was created so that researchers have an opportunity to analyze the historical context. Alternative news reporting may be found in Hoʻolaupaʻi Hawaiian Nūpepa Collection http://nupepa.org/gsdl2.5/cgi-bin/nupepa?l=en

  4. […] the morning of August 12, 1898, a ceremony at Iolani Palace marked the U.S. annexation of Hawaii. The Royal Hawaiian Band played Hawaii Ponoi as the Hawaiian […]


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