First Public Airport

Today in history–March 21, 1927–Hawaii’s first official civilian airfield, John Rodgers Airport, was dedicated. It was renamed Honolulu International Airport and became among the busiest U.S. airports with over 21 million passengers per year.

Read more about how people Hawaii traveled in “Trans-Pacific Travel.”

Trans-Pacific Travel
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/trans-pacific-travel/


St. Patrick’s Day in Honolulu

Today in history — St. Patrick’s Day 1914 — You didn’t need to be Irish to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day; you just needed to enjoy toasting to Saint Patrick.

On this day, Honolulu’s elites held and attended parties, which included green decorations, alcohol for toasting, food, and music. In these parties, people could be seen giving toast to Saint Patrick, and people singing Irish-themed songs (e.g. “My Dear Old Irish Mother”) and an orchestra playing could be heard. In fact, even the governor of Hawaii, Lucius Pinkham, attended a party and gave a brief toast. Read more about it in “Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet.”

“Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 17, 1914, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1914-03-17/ed-1/seq-7/


Vietnam War through the Eyes of Hawaii’s Journalists

Hawaii journalists Bob Jones and Denby Fawcett covered Vietnam War for The Honolulu Advertiser, and now you can see what they saw:

“Vietnam: The War and the People,” photography exhibition
Lama Library, Kapiolani Community College
Library Hours: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday to 4 p.m.


Kaiulani’s Death

Today in history — March 6, 1899 — Princess Victoria Kaiulani left the world at 23 years old. Surrounded by her loved ones, the apparent heir to the throne of the Hawaiian Kingdom died of rheumatism. The Hawaiian Gazette described Kaiulani’s popularity:

Kaiulani was the idol of the natives. The mourning will be deep and general. With the foreign population the young lady was a great favorite. She was a leader in social affairs and charitable enterprises.

Read more about her death and life in the article “Death Calls the Princess.”

“Death Calls the Princess”
Hawaiian gazette, March 7, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-03-07/ed-1/seq-1/


King Kalakaua’s Silverware for Sale

This month in history — March 1916 — King Kalakaua’s silver knife and spoon and other “Hawaiian trinkets” were seen at a Los Angeles grocery window. The flatware was reportedly engraved with the monarch’s coat of arms.

Twenty-three years before after the overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy in 1893, royal heirlooms were sold off. Their whereabouts were unknown, and they included furniture, jewelry, fine China, sterling flatware, and paintings.

Read more about it in “Trinkets from Hawaii in Los Angeles Store Delight Street Goers.”

“Trinkets from Hawaii in Los Angeles Store Delight Street Goers”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 22, 1916, Page 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-03-22/ed-1/seq-4/