Digitized Hawaii Japanese Newspapers

Nippu Jiji Masthead

From Dore Minatodani:

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University digitized hoji shinbun, Japanese newspapers published outside of Japan. In this case, the newspapers are from Hawaii, Washington state, and California. Most of the papers are available to all, but some are restricted to Stanford users only.

Hawaii papers available to all:

Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun / 布哇植民新聞 [The Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun], (Hilo, HI)
Hawaii Times / 布哇タイムス, (Honolulu, HI)
Nippu Jiji / 日布時事 [The Nippu Jiji], (Honolulu, HI)

Hawaii papers restricted to Stanford users:

Hawaii Herald, (Honolulu, HI)
Hawaii Hōchi / ハワイ報知 [The Hawaii Hochi], (Honolulu, HI)

http://hojishinbun.hoover.org/

Mahalo to Dore for letting us know!

Hawaii Hōchi Masthead
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Princess Ruth Keʻelikōlani Died

Today in history — May 24, 1883 — Princess Ruth Luka Keanolani Kauanahoahoa Keʻelikōlani died at age 56. Born in 1826, Keʻelikōlani (“leaf bud of heaven”) served as Royal Governor of the Island of Hawaii. Throughout her life, Keʻelikōlani defended the Hawaiian culture.

As a grandchild of Kamehameha I, Keʻelikōlani served as the primary heir to the Kamehameha family. Thus, When she died, Keʻelikōlani was the richest woman in Hawaii and owned almost nine percent of the land in Hawaii.

Through Keʻelikōlani’s will, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bernice Bishop inherited 353,000 acres of Kamehameha Lands and became the largest private landowner in Hawaii. After Pauahi died, her husband Charles Reed Bishop executed her will and used her land to create the Bishop Museum, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate and Kamehameha Schools.

Read more about it in “Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.”

“Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani”
The Daily bulletin, May 28, 1883, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1883-05-28/ed-1/seq-2/


Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha!

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha! The last child born from a reigning Hawaiian monarch entered the world with fanfare on May 20, 1858. A gun salute was heard around Honolulu. Raised flags and colorful streamers festooned homes and businesses. At Iolani Palace, children visited the newborn with gifts, including a baby carriage with an embroidered pillow and three silk flags.

Read more about the prince in “Prince Albert Kamehameha.”

Prince Albert Kamehameha
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/prince-albert-kamehameha/


Father Damien’s Arrival in Hawaii

Today in history — May 10, 1873 — Father Damien and his bishop arrived at Kalaupapa, where leprosy victims lived in exile.

Dedicating his life to serving those victims, Father Damien encouraged civility through establishing laws, constructed buildings, coffins, and a water system, planted trees, encouraged the government to provide more resources, and boosted morale. The Belgian missionary priest’s selflessness made him famous internationally.

Read more about it in Hawaii in “Leprosy.”

Leprosy
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/leprosy/


Rebuilding Public Trust in the Media

Looking to the Future: Rebuilding Public Trust in the Media
George Chaplin Fellowship in Distinguished Journalism Address featuring Elizabeth Jensen
May 8, 5:00pm – 7:00pm
Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, Manoa Grand Ballroom, 2454 S. Beretania St.

Trust in the media has steeply declined in the past several decades, even as surveys show that the public believes democracy requires the press to keep government institutions honest. Thanks in part to social media, news consumers are increasingly retreating into their own partisan political bubbles, while a flood of fake news muddles the national debate. Solutions may be at hand, however, as new research identifies elements that go into making media that the public finds trustworthy.

As NPR’s Ombudsman/Public Editor, Elizabeth Jensen serves as the public’s representative, bringing transparency to matters of journalism and ethics. Over her three decades in the field, Jensen has reported on journalistic decision-making, mergers and acquisitions, content, institutional transformations, the media-politics nexus, and advertising for The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal and numerous others.

Jensen’s Chaplin address marks the 50th year of EWC media programs, which began with the Jefferson Fellowships program for journalists in 1967. The George Chaplin Fellowship in Distinguished Journalism was established in 1986 to honor the leadership and ideals of longtime Honolulu Advertiser Editor-in-chief George Chaplin.

Reception to follow. No host cocktails. Aloha attire.

Free and open to the public. Limited seating.
R.S.V.P. (808) 944-7111 / ewcinfo@EastWestCenter.org

Validated parking will be available for $6 in the JCCH parking structure.

Event Sponsors
East-West Center and Hawaii Public Radio

More Information
(808) 944-7111, EWCInfo@eastwestcenter.org


May Day in Hawaii

Today in history — May 1, 1902 — Students from Royal School, Kamehameha School, Oahu College (Punahou School), and Kawaiahao Seminary sang for May Day. Boys from Kamehameha School sang Hawaiian melodies with orchestral music, and girls wore white dresses to school.

In Lahaina, Maui, children did the maypole march, raised the flag, and sang.

Read more about it in “The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina.”

“The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina”
Hawaiian star, May 2, 1902, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1902-05-02/ed-1/seq-7/