Queen Liliuokalani on the Day Her Country Lost Independence

Today in history — “On the morning of August 12, 1898, troops from the warship USS Philadelphia marched ashore for the ceremony at Iolani Palace formally recognizing the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands by the United States. lowering the Hawaiian flag in 1898.

“On the morning of August 12, 1898, a ceremony at Iolani Palace marked the U.S. annexation of Hawaii. The Royal Hawaiian Band played Hawaii Ponoi as the Hawaiian flag went down and The Star-Spangled Banner as the American flag went up.”

What was Queen Liliuokalani doing? She stayed in her home, Washington Place, with family members and loyalists:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/

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The Annexation of Hawaii

Today in history — July 14, 1898 — the United States of America claimed Hawaii as its own. Pro-annexationists celebrated and raised the American flag. Royalists mourned Hawaii’s colonization, and Native Hawaiians previously protested through a petition.

Read more about it in “ANNEXATION!: HERE TO STAY!”

Note: This article does not represent HDNP’s views.

“ANNEXATION!: HERE TO STAY!”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 14, 1898, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-07-14/ed-1/seq-1/


Hawaiian Music Barred on the Atlantic City Boardwalk

Yaaka Hula Hickey DulaThis month in history — July 1910 — Hawaiian music was banned on the Atlantic City boardwalk.

In the early 1900s, Hawaiian music dazzled the U.S. mainland. Record houses pumped out songs, including “Yaaka Hula Hickey Dula,” “Pretty Baby,” and “She Sang Aloha to Me.” Through Hawaii corporations (e.g. Hawaii Promotion Committee and Hawaiian Pineapple Company), Hawaiian musicians promoted Hawaii around the world.

However, on the Atlantic City boardwalk, a hotel claimed Hawaiian music lowered standards. Read more about it in “Hawaii’s Music Barred on Walk.”

“Hawaii’s Music Barred on Walk”
The Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1910-07-29/ed-1/seq-2/


Charles Reed Bishop Died

Today in history — June 7, 1915 — Charles Reed Bishop died in San Francisco.

Hailing from Glens Falls, New York, Bishop was a businessman, philanthropist, and husband of Bernice Pauahi Bishop and founded the Bishop Museum, which was dedicated to her. Read about his funeral in “Funeral of Late Charles Reed Bishop Attended by Royalty and High Officials.”

“Funeral of Late Charles Reed Bishop Attended by Royalty and High Officials”
Hawaiian gazette, June 25, 1915, Page 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1915-06-25/ed-1/seq-8/


Earliest Golf Games

image_681x801_from_0,2713_to_2464,5612Today in history — April 16, 1895 — The Daily Bulletin makes the earliest mention of golf in a Hawaii newspaper:

“Golf has been introduced in Honolulu. It is played at Punahou near the college. This is a favorite Scottish summer game.”

Five months later, The Hawaiian Gazette suggests the land in the back of Oahu College (now Punahou School) as “an admirable place for golf links.”

On January 3, 1896, The Hawaiian Gazette reported that six people, including President Sanford B. Dole and Walter Dillingham, have formed a golf club, which planned to “[awaken] genuine golf enthusiasm on the islands” and increase the club’s membership.
Sources
“Local and General News”
The Daily bulletin., April 16, 1895, Page 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1895-04-16/ed-1/seq-5/
“Local Brevities”

The Hawaiian gazette., September 13, 1895, Page 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1895-09-13/ed-1/seq-5/

“Game of Golf”
The Hawaiian gazette, January 3, 1896, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1896-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/


Queen Liliuokalani’s Mother-in-law Dies

This month in history — April 25, 1889 — Queen Liliuokalani’s mother-in-law, Mary Lambert Jones Dominis, died. She had a close relationship with her son, Prince Consort John Owen Dominis. Mrs. Dominis reportedly denigrated her non-Caucasian daughter-in-law, but, in her last years, appreciated Liliuokalani as a respectful wife to her son.

Read more about the owner of Washington Place (right image) in “Death of Mrs. Dominis.”

“Death of Mrs. Dominis: The Aged Mother of Ex-Governor Dominis Passes Away–Tokens of Respect”
Pacific commercial advertiser, April 26, 1889, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1889-04-26/ed-1/seq-3/


Prince Kuhio’s Birthday

Today in history — March 26, 1911 — Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole celebrated his birthday at Colonel Sam Parker’s Pearl Harbor home. About fifty people, including government officials, attended this luau. Read more about it in “Party Is Given on Delegate’s Birthday.”

“Party Is Given on Delegate’s Birthday: Col. Sam Parker’s Home Scene of Merrymaking to Honor Kuhio”
Evening bulletin, March 27, 1911, Page 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1911-03-27/ed-1/seq-6/