Earthy Poems for an Earthly Day

Love the earth through poetry!

The Tree Planter

He who plants a tree,
He plants love;
Tents of coolness spreading out
Above.

Heaven and earth help him
who plants a tree.
And his work its own reward shall be.

Cultivate your earthly love with more wooden poetry: “Who Plants a Tree.”

“Who Plants a Tree”
The Jasper news, April 28, 1921, Image 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90061052/1921-04-28/ed-1/seq-9/


Sinking of the Titanic

Today in history — April 15, 1912 — “Iceberg straight ahead!”, exclaimed a sailor on the RMS Titanic, the infamous cruise ship. Regardless of whether the quote from the movie Titanic was actually said, the sailors on the real RMS Titanic did spot an iceberg while sailing on the North Atlantic Ocean at 11:40 p.m.

Ironically, had the ship continued its course and hit the iceberg, the ship would have stayed afloat. However, the sailors instead tried to dodge the iceberg by turning the ship. But because it was sailing too quickly, the ship hit the iceberg, its fatal blow.

The more-than-2,000 passengers felt the “thud,” which made coffee and tea in the dining halls spill on tablecloths, stain women’s dresses, and interrupted conversations. However, the sailors did not alert the passengers. Feeling safe, they continued to enjoy their parties and went to bed after.

However, hours later, the passengers woke up to a sinking ship filling with water. To save themselves, they wore life vests, ran, swam for their lives in freezing seawater, and evacuated into lifeboats while hearing the calm, soothing music of a string quartet.

But the British passenger liner did not have enough lifeboats because planners thought the ship was too strong to sink. And after the ship sank, many of the lifeboats still had room for more passengers, but alas, the ship was not evacuated early enough. Thus, more than 1,300 people died early April 15, 1912. Read more about one of the worst maritime disasters of history in “Sinking of the Titanic”!

“Sinking of the Titanic”
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/titanicsinking.html


Emil Melville’s Balloon Ride

Up, up and away! This month in history–March 1889–before airplanes, hot-air balloons were becoming popular.

In Hawaii, Emil Melville would attempt the first human flight and first manned ascent on a balloon, perform acrobatic stunts, and hang from a trapeze.

How did Mr. Melville’s attempt go? Find out by reading “Emil Melville’s Balloon Ride.”

https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/emil-melvilles-balloon-ride/


St. Patrick’s Day in Honolulu

Today in history — St. Patrick’s Day 1914 — You didn’t need to be Irish to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day; you just needed to enjoy toasting to Saint Patrick.

On this day, Honolulu’s elites held and attended parties, which included green decorations, alcohol for toasting, food, and music. In these parties, people could be seen giving toast to Saint Patrick, and people singing Irish-themed songs (e.g. “My Dear Old Irish Mother”) and an orchestra playing could be heard. In fact, even the governor of Hawaii, Lucius Pinkham, attended a party and gave a brief toast. Read more about it in “Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet.”

“Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 17, 1914, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1914-03-17/ed-1/seq-7/


Kaiulani’s Death

Today in history — March 6, 1899 — Princess Victoria Kaiulani left the world at 23 years old. Surrounded by her loved ones, the apparent heir to the throne of the Hawaiian Kingdom died of rheumatism. The Hawaiian Gazette described Kaiulani’s popularity:

Kaiulani was the idol of the natives. The mourning will be deep and general. With the foreign population the young lady was a great favorite. She was a leader in social affairs and charitable enterprises.

Read more about her death and life in the article “Death Calls the Princess.”

“Death Calls the Princess”
Hawaiian gazette, March 7, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-03-07/ed-1/seq-1/


Passing of Sans Souci Hotel

This month in history — February 1900 — one of Hawaii’s first hotels, the Sans Souci Hotel closed. Famed author Robert Louis Stevenson lived here during his stay in Hawaii.

As the owner supported the Hawaiian monarchy, conspirators met here to plan the 1895 counter-revolution against the Provisional Government.

Read more about its closure in “Passing of Sans Souci.”

“Passing of Sans Souci”
Hawaiian star, February 5, 1900, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1900-02-05/ed-1/seq-3/


Japanese Internment Camps in WWII

Today in history — February 19, 1942 — U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which imprisoned 75,000 Japanese Americans and 45,000 Japanese nationals in “internment camps” across the country.

A local man from Hawaii in Northern California, Masuto Hata was imprisoned even though he fought for America in WWI. Also, even though his son Makoto stayed in a concentration camp, he enlisted in the military and got seriously wounded in a battle in Italy.

Read more about it in “Local Japanese Soldier Is Killed” (bottom text and right image).

Local Japanese Soldier Is Killed

Local relatives have been notified one Fresno soldier of Japanese ancestry has been killed in action and another seriously wounded.

Private Haruo Kawamoto lost his life on the Italian front and Private Makoto M. Hata is in serious condition with a shell fragment wound in the abdomen. Hata is in a hospital in Italy.

Kawamoto, 20, was a graduate of the Central Union High School. He was an honor student and one of the speakers at the graduation exercises in the Fresno Japanese Assembly Center in 1942. He entered the service in July, 1944, received his basic training at Camp Blanding, Fla., and was sent overseas in January. He served in France and Italy with an infantry division. Two of his brothers are in the service: Corporal Yurio Kawamoto of Fort Sam Houston, Tex., who volunteered in March 1941, and Private First Class Mitsu Kawamoto who is serving in Italy. Another brother, Toshio Kawamoto, is living near Fresno, and his father and two sisters are in the relocation center at Amachi, Colo.

Hata, 23, has seen service in Italy and France with the infantry. He is a son of Masuto Hata of Ashlan Avenue.”

Makoto Hata – Fresno Bee, Republican, Fresno CA, 05/09/1945 p. 14