First Public Airport

Today in history–March 21, 1927–Hawaii’s first official civilian airfield, John Rodgers Airport, was dedicated. It was renamed Honolulu International Airport and became among the busiest U.S. airports with over 21 million passengers per year.

Read more about how people Hawaii traveled in “Trans-Pacific Travel.”

Trans-Pacific Travel
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/trans-pacific-travel/


St. Patrick’s Day in Honolulu

Today in history — St. Patrick’s Day 1914 — You didn’t need to be Irish to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day; you just needed to enjoy toasting to Saint Patrick.

On this day, Honolulu’s elites held and attended parties, which included green decorations, alcohol for toasting, food, and music. In these parties, people could be seen giving toast to Saint Patrick, and people singing Irish-themed songs (e.g. “My Dear Old Irish Mother”) and an orchestra playing could be heard. In fact, even the governor of Hawaii, Lucius Pinkham, attended a party and gave a brief toast. Read more about it in “Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet.”

“Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 17, 1914, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1914-03-17/ed-1/seq-7/


King Kalakaua’s Silverware for Sale

This month in history — March 1916 — King Kalakaua’s silver knife and spoon and other “Hawaiian trinkets” were seen at a Los Angeles grocery window. The flatware was reportedly engraved with the monarch’s coat of arms.

Twenty-three years before after the overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy in 1893, royal heirlooms were sold off. Their whereabouts were unknown, and they included furniture, jewelry, fine China, sterling flatware, and paintings.

Read more about it in “Trinkets from Hawaii in Los Angeles Store Delight Street Goers.”

“Trinkets from Hawaii in Los Angeles Store Delight Street Goers”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 22, 1916, Page 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-03-22/ed-1/seq-4/


Passing of Sans Souci Hotel

This month in history — February 1900 — one of Hawaii’s first hotels, the Sans Souci Hotel closed. Famed author Robert Louis Stevenson lived here during his stay in Hawaii.

As the owner supported the Hawaiian monarchy, conspirators met here to plan the 1895 counter-revolution against the Provisional Government.

Read more about its closure in “Passing of Sans Souci.”

“Passing of Sans Souci”
Hawaiian star, February 5, 1900, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1900-02-05/ed-1/seq-3/


Japanese Internment Camps in WWII

Today in history — February 19, 1942 — U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which imprisoned 75,000 Japanese Americans and 45,000 Japanese nationals in “internment camps” across the country.

A local man from Hawaii in Northern California, Masuto Hata was imprisoned even though he fought for America in WWI. Also, even though his son Makoto stayed in a concentration camp, he enlisted in the military and got seriously wounded in a battle in Italy.

Read more about it in “Local Japanese Soldier Is Killed” (bottom text and right image).

Local Japanese Soldier Is Killed

Local relatives have been notified one Fresno soldier of Japanese ancestry has been killed in action and another seriously wounded.

Private Haruo Kawamoto lost his life on the Italian front and Private Makoto M. Hata is in serious condition with a shell fragment wound in the abdomen. Hata is in a hospital in Italy.

Kawamoto, 20, was a graduate of the Central Union High School. He was an honor student and one of the speakers at the graduation exercises in the Fresno Japanese Assembly Center in 1942. He entered the service in July, 1944, received his basic training at Camp Blanding, Fla., and was sent overseas in January. He served in France and Italy with an infantry division. Two of his brothers are in the service: Corporal Yurio Kawamoto of Fort Sam Houston, Tex., who volunteered in March 1941, and Private First Class Mitsu Kawamoto who is serving in Italy. Another brother, Toshio Kawamoto, is living near Fresno, and his father and two sisters are in the relocation center at Amachi, Colo.

Hata, 23, has seen service in Italy and France with the infantry. He is a son of Masuto Hata of Ashlan Avenue.”

Makoto Hata – Fresno Bee, Republican, Fresno CA, 05/09/1945 p. 14


The First Motorcycle in Hawaii

Today in history–February 15, 1901–the motorcycle debuted in Hawaii. Mr. Whitman, manager of the Tribune bicycle agency, took the very first spin around downtown Honolulu and Waikiki. Read about the first motorcycle ride in Hawaii in “First Motorcycles in Hawaii.”

First Motorcycles in Hawaii
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/first-motorcycles-in-hawaii/


First Comics in Hawaii Newspapers

Today in history–January 30, 1904–the first comic strips in Hawaii debuted in the Evening Bulletin.

In color, the first comics consisted of seven multi-panel strips of comedic cartoons, such as the following:

Earlier comics appeared in North American newspapers in the late 1800s.

Probably due to the lack of interest, the Evening Bulletin eventually stopped publishing comics. However, comic strips would eventually reappear in Hawaii’s newspapers, such as the Honolulu Star-Advertiser today.

The First Comic Strips

Evening bulletin, Jan. 30, 1904, Image 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1904-01-30/ed-1/seq-9/
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1904-01-30/ed-1/seq-10/
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1904-01-30/ed-1/seq-11/
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1904-01-30/ed-1/seq-12/

Search Strategy
After the Evening Bulletin’s January 30, 1904, the comic strips appeared every other Saturday.