Kamehameha I Statue

Today in history — February 14, 1883 — King Kalakaua unveiled the King Kamehameha I statue. Wearing a Hawaiian flag and a royal standard, the statue stood in front of Aliiolani Hale across from Iolani Palace.

As the hundreds of spectators watched, the Royal Hawaiian Band played the Kingdom’s pieces, and the military stood in attention.

Read more about the ceremony in “Unveiling of the Statue of Kamehameha I.”

“Unveiling of the Statue of Kamehameha I”
Pacific commercial advertiser, Feb. 17, 1883, Page 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1883-02-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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King Kamehameha IV’s Funeral

Today in history – February 3, 1864 – King Kamehameha IV was buried with his son Prince Albert at Mauna Loa. On South King Street, a hearse with four white horses pulled Kamehameha IV’s body, surrounded by people holding kahili of various colors. Read more about Kamehameha IV’s funeral in “Funeral of the Late King.”

“Funeral of the Late King”
Pacific commercial advertiser, February 4, 1864, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1864-02-04/ed-1/seq-1/


Queen Liliuokalani’s Attendant Died

Today in history — January 26, 1911 — Joseph Aea, Queen Liliuokalani’s attendant, died in his Pauoa home at 10 p.m. With a “picturesque” personality, he has known Liliuokalani’s family for years and traveled with her to Washington D.C. Read more about Aea in “Faithful Service Ended by Death.”

“Faithful Service Ended by Death: Picturesque Personality Passes from Side of Queen He Was Loyal To”
Hawaiian gazette, January 27, 1911, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1911-01-27/ed-1/seq-3/


Honolulu’s 1908 Christmas Eve

Christmas eve in Honolulu in 1908 is similar to today’s: last-minute shopping, church services, and parties. The Hawaiian Star captured these scenes and more in “Christmas Well Kept.”

“Christmas Well Kept”
Hawaiian star, December 26, 1908, Page 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1908-12-26/ed-1/seq-6/


1916 Thanksgiving in Honolulu

Thanksgiving 1916 — people in Honolulu attended church services, dinners (including luau) at schools and hospitals, and performances. Read more about it in “Thanksgiving in Honolulu Is Day Widely Observed.”

“Thanksgiving in Honolulu Is Day Widely Observed”
Honolulu star-bulletin, December 1, 1916, Page 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-12-01/ed-1/seq-8/


Visiting Kilauea Volcano in 1847

This month in history — November 1847 — the Polynesian described a three-day journey to Kilauea Volcano’s summit, which meant a chilly, voggy thirty-mile horseback ride and an overnight stay through camping or living in a grass hut.

With other travelers, an editor of the Polynesian made the three-week trip: sailing from Honolulu, climbing up and down Kilauea, and sailing home for $50.

Read more about his journey in “A Trip to the Crater of Kilauea.”

“A Trip to the Crater of Kilauea”
Polynesian, November 6, 1847, Page 98
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015408/1847-11-06/ed-1/seq-2/


The House of Sun: Haleakala Now Hawaii National Park

Today in history — August 1, 1916 — the National Park Service established the Hawaii National Park: Haleakala National Park on Maui and Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Big Island as the Hawaii National Park.

The Hawaiians visited Haleakala mountain, a dormant volcano, as a sacred place. In Hawaiian folklore, demigod Maui’s grandmother lived in Haleakala’s summit. She helped Maui to slow down the sun to lengthen the day.

Calling it the “House of the Sun,” the Native Hawaiians mined Haleakala rocks for tools.

Read more about Haleakala.

Haleakala: https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/haleakala/