King Kamehameha IV Marries Emma Rooke

Today in history–June 19, 1856–King Kamehameha IV married Emma Rooke. In a ceremony conducted in both Hawaiian and English, they exchanged their vows in front of 3,000 people and did something different:

“The kneeling of the royal bridegroom and his bride before the altar and exchanging their vows before the audience was so different from the simple custom usually observed here in marriage…”

Read more about this wedding in the article “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/


The Conversion of Iolani Palace to a Government Building

This week in history — June 1893 — the Provisional Government converted Iolani Palace from a Hawaiian royalty residence to a government building.

A few months after the overthrow, Iolani Palace was now called the “Executive Building” for the Republic of Hawaii. Government offices moved in, redesigned the interior, and auctioned off the furniture and furnishings:

The old carved table upon which the bodies of the Kamehamehas were laid out after death was seen standing in the walk on the Ewa side of the building. It was tabu to the natives around the premises, and none of them would go near it or touch it. They did not seem to have the same fear of the tabu lately laid upon ‘the ex-queen’s palace’ by the kahunas to keep the haoles out …

Read more about it in “At the Capitol.”

The Hawaiian gazette, June 6, 1893, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1893-06-06/ed-1/seq-3/


Princess Ruth Keʻelikōlani Died

Today in history — May 24, 1883 — Princess Ruth Luka Keanolani Kauanahoahoa Keʻelikōlani died at age 56. Born in 1826, Keʻelikōlani (“leaf bud of heaven”) served as Royal Governor of the Island of Hawaii. Throughout her life, Keʻelikōlani defended the Hawaiian culture.

As a grandchild of Kamehameha I, Keʻelikōlani served as the primary heir to the Kamehameha family. Thus, When she died, Keʻelikōlani was the richest woman in Hawaii and owned almost nine percent of the land in Hawaii.

Through Keʻelikōlani’s will, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bernice Bishop inherited 353,000 acres of Kamehameha Lands and became the largest private landowner in Hawaii. After Pauahi died, her husband Charles Reed Bishop executed her will and used her land to create the Bishop Museum, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate and Kamehameha Schools.

Read more about it in “Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.”

“Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani”
The Daily bulletin, May 28, 1883, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1883-05-28/ed-1/seq-2/


Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha!

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha! The last child born from a reigning Hawaiian monarch entered the world with fanfare on May 20, 1858. A gun salute was heard around Honolulu. Raised flags and colorful streamers festooned homes and businesses. At Iolani Palace, children visited the newborn with gifts, including a baby carriage with an embroidered pillow and three silk flags.

Read more about the prince in “Prince Albert Kamehameha.”

Prince Albert Kamehameha
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/prince-albert-kamehameha/


Father Damien’s Arrival in Hawaii

Today in history — May 10, 1873 — Father Damien and his bishop arrived at Kalaupapa, where leprosy victims lived in exile.

Dedicating his life to serving those victims, Father Damien encouraged civility through establishing laws, constructed buildings, coffins, and a water system, planted trees, encouraged the government to provide more resources, and boosted morale. The Belgian missionary priest’s selflessness made him famous internationally.

Read more about it in Hawaii in “Leprosy.”

Leprosy
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/leprosy/


May Day in Hawaii

Today in history — May 1, 1902 — Students from Royal School, Kamehameha School, Oahu College (Punahou School), and Kawaiahao Seminary sang for May Day. Boys from Kamehameha School sang Hawaiian melodies with orchestral music, and girls wore white dresses to school.

In Lahaina, Maui, children did the maypole march, raised the flag, and sang.

Read more about it in “The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina.”

“The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina”
Hawaiian star, May 2, 1902, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1902-05-02/ed-1/seq-7/


Whisky Growing in a Pineapple Field

This month in history — April 1912 — “Pineapple Field Is Found to Grow Splendid Whisky.” At a pineapple field in Wahiawa, a license inspector investigated the blind pigs (illegal alcohol dealers), and a man tried to sell beer to him.

Read more about it in “Pineapple Field Is Found to Grow Splendid Whisky.”

“Pineapple Field Is Found to Grow Splendid Whisky”
Hawaiian gazette, April 12, 1912, Page 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1912-04-12/ed-1/seq-2/