Mele Kalikimaka and Merry Christmas!

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The Pacific commercial advertiser., December 25, 1909, SECOND SECTION, Page 15

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Pacific commercial advertiser, Dec. 25, 1909, Page 1

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The Hawaiian gazette., December 23, 1913, Page 5, Image 5


Honolulu’s 1908 Christmas Eve

Christmas eve in Honolulu in 1908 is similar to today’s: last-minute shopping, church services, and parties. The Hawaiian Star captured these scenes and more in “Christmas Well Kept.”

“Christmas Well Kept”
Hawaiian star, December 26, 1908, Page 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1908-12-26/ed-1/seq-6/


1916 Thanksgiving in Honolulu

Thanksgiving 1916 — people in Honolulu attended church services, dinners (including luau) at schools and hospitals, and performances. Read more about it in “Thanksgiving in Honolulu Is Day Widely Observed.”

“Thanksgiving in Honolulu Is Day Widely Observed”
Honolulu star-bulletin, December 1, 1916, Page 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-12-01/ed-1/seq-8/


Chinese New Year in Prison

This month in history — January 1900 — Quarantined Chinese people in Hawaii wanted to celebrate their most important holiday: Chinese New Year. They requested from the government 25,000 fire crackers and one can of peanut oil, so they could blow them up at the Kakaako detention camp.

Read more about this Chinese New Year in“To Celebrate New Year’s” (far right).

“To Celebrate New Year’s”
The Hawaiian star, January 29, 1900, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1900-01-29/ed-1/seq-1/


Happy Holidays

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  Happy Holidays

 From the Hawai’i Digital Newspaper Project at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa Library

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Halloween in Palama

In 1912, Halloween in Palama meant attending a party with two-thousand people of all ages.

The carnival in the gymnasium featured a “fish pond” of prizes, shoot the chutes, and pie-eating and apple-eating contests. Kids dressed in costumes: clowns, ghosts, and witches.

Read more about it in “2,000 People in Halloween Party at Palama.”

“2,000 People in Halloween Party at Palama”
Honolulu star-bulletin, November 01, 1912, Page 5 http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1912-11-01/ed-1/seq-5/


La Kuokoa o Hawaii Nei: Celebrating the Kingdom of Hawaii’s Independence

Today in history — November 28, 1860 — The Hawaiian Kingdom celebrated La Kuokoa o Hawaii nei. This national holiday commemorated France and the United Kingdom’s recognizing Hawaii as an independent state and “civilized” nation in 1843.

King Kamehameha IV received congratulations from consuls of the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. Read more about it in “Reception at the Palace.”

“Reception at the Palace”
Polynesian, December 1, 1860, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015408/1860-12-01/ed-1/seq-2/