King Kamehameha III’s Funeral

Today in history — December 15, 1854 — King Kamehameha III died. During his reign, he initiated the Great Mahele and oversaw the Westernization of Hawaii. The Hawaiian Kingdom mourned his death and held a grand funeral for him at Iolani Palace, complete with processions, black kahili, feather cloaks, and a glit crown.

Read more about it in “Funeral of Kamehameha III.”

“Funeral of His Late Majesty: Kamehameha III”
Polynesian, January 13, 1855, Page 142, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015408/1855-01-13/ed-1/seq-2/

Advertisements

Tribute to the Last Hawaiian Monarch

100 years ago today — November 11, 1917 — Queen Liliuokalani died. Dressed in a holoku of borcaded duchesse satin trimmed with rose-point lace, her body rested in state on a yellow-draped koa table in Kawaiahao Church. Hundreds of people went to pay tribute to Hawaii’s former head of state.

Read more about it in “Body of Hawaii’s Queen Rests in State.”

“Body of Hawaii’s Queen Rests in State”
Honolulu star-bulletin, November 13, 1917, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-11-13/ed-1/seq-2/


Prince Consort John Dominis’ Death

Today in history — August 27, 1891 —  the husband of Queen Liliuokalani, John Dominis died. Read more about the Royal Governor of Oahu and Prince Consort in “A Second Sorrow.”

“A Second Sorrow: Death of His Royal Highness the Prince Consort”
The Daily bulletin, August 28, 1891, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1891-08-28/ed-1/seq-3/


Queen Kapiolani’s Funeral

This month in history — July 4, 1899 — Queen Kapiolani’s funeral. Flowers and kahili decorated Kawaiahao Church, and it was “crowded to its utmost.” To the organ’s melody, choirs sang solemn funeral selections such as Handel’s Largo.

To read more about the funeral of King Kalakaua’s wife, read “Passing of the Queen Dowager.”

The Hawaiian gazette, July 5, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-07-05/ed-1/seq-1/


Princess Ruth Keʻelikōlani Died

Today in history — May 24, 1883 — Princess Ruth Luka Keanolani Kauanahoahoa Keʻelikōlani died at age 56. Born in 1826, Keʻelikōlani (“leaf bud of heaven”) served as Royal Governor of the Island of Hawaii. Throughout her life, Keʻelikōlani defended the Hawaiian culture.

As a grandchild of Kamehameha I, Keʻelikōlani served as the primary heir to the Kamehameha family. Thus, When she died, Keʻelikōlani was the richest woman in Hawaii and owned almost nine percent of the land in Hawaii.

Through Keʻelikōlani’s will, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bernice Bishop inherited 353,000 acres of Kamehameha Lands and became the largest private landowner in Hawaii. After Pauahi died, her husband Charles Reed Bishop executed her will and used her land to create the Bishop Museum, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate and Kamehameha Schools.

Read more about it in “Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.”

“Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani”
The Daily bulletin, May 28, 1883, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1883-05-28/ed-1/seq-2/


Jules Tavernier: The Volcano Artist

Today in history — April 27, 1844 — Hawaiian volcano artist Jules Tavernier was born in Paris, France. Although he lived only his final five years in Hawaii, Tavernier painted as the most significant artist in Hawaii’s Volcano School (non-native Hawaiian artists who painted night scenes of Hawaii’s erupting volcanoes).
Beyond the jagged cliffs of Kilauea Volcano, the Halemaumau lava lake’s orange red glow illuminates the night (left image). Above, smoke shrouds the lake, and a full moon peeks behind grayish black clouds.

To paint this picture, in 1887, Jules Tavernier (1844-1889) made a grueling one-to-two day journey on horseback up to Kilauea’s peak.

Although the English French artist spent less than five years in Hawaii, Tavernier is considered the most significant artist in Hawaii’s Volcano School … Read more

Jules Tavernier: The Volcano Artist
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/jules-tavernier-the-volcano-artist/


Sinking of the Titanic

Today in history — April 15, 1912 — “Iceberg straight ahead!”, exclaimed a sailor on the RMS Titanic, the infamous cruise ship. Regardless of whether the quote from the movie Titanic was actually said, the sailors on the real RMS Titanic did spot an iceberg while sailing on the North Atlantic Ocean at 11:40 p.m.

Ironically, had the ship continued its course and hit the iceberg, the ship would have stayed afloat. However, the sailors instead tried to dodge the iceberg by turning the ship. But because it was sailing too quickly, the ship hit the iceberg, its fatal blow.

The more-than-2,000 passengers felt the “thud,” which made coffee and tea in the dining halls spill on tablecloths, stain women’s dresses, and interrupted conversations. However, the sailors did not alert the passengers. Feeling safe, they continued to enjoy their parties and went to bed after.

However, hours later, the passengers woke up to a sinking ship filling with water. To save themselves, they wore life vests, ran, swam for their lives in freezing seawater, and evacuated into lifeboats while hearing the calm, soothing music of a string quartet.

But the British passenger liner did not have enough lifeboats because planners thought the ship was too strong to sink. And after the ship sank, many of the lifeboats still had room for more passengers, but alas, the ship was not evacuated early enough. Thus, more than 1,300 people died early April 15, 1912. Read more about one of the worst maritime disasters of history in “Sinking of the Titanic”!

“Sinking of the Titanic”
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/titanicsinking.html