King Kamehameha IV Marries Emma Rooke

Today in history–June 19, 1856–King Kamehameha IV married Emma Rooke. In a ceremony conducted in both Hawaiian and English, they exchanged their vows in front of 3,000 people and did something different:

“The kneeling of the royal bridegroom and his bride before the altar and exchanging their vows before the audience was so different from the simple custom usually observed here in marriage…”

Read more about this wedding in the article “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/

Advertisements

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha!

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha! The last child born from a reigning Hawaiian monarch entered the world with fanfare on May 20, 1858. A gun salute was heard around Honolulu. Raised flags and colorful streamers festooned homes and businesses. At Iolani Palace, children visited the newborn with gifts, including a baby carriage with an embroidered pillow and three silk flags.

Read more about the prince in “Prince Albert Kamehameha.”

Prince Albert Kamehameha
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/prince-albert-kamehameha/


Marriage of King Kamehameha IV & Emma Rooke

Queen Emma

This month in history — June 19, 1856: by marrying the king, Emma Rooke became Hawaii’s queen. For this national holiday, flags were hung on government buildings. Hours before, thousands of citizens arrived at the stone church where the ceremony would take place. However, more than half of them were turned away as the church could fit only 3,000 people.

Finally at 11:30 a.m., the crowd saw the twenty-year-old bride walk down the aisle: Emma in a white embroidered silk dress with her father and three bridesmaid (including the future Queen Liliuokalani). Crowned by a flower lei of white roses and orange flowers, the descendant of Hawaiian royalty looked straight at the altar through her bridal veil.

Donning a uniform and a sword, King Alexander LiholihoKing Kamehameha IV–marched with his father–the Royal Governor of Oahu.

King Kamehameha IV

Marking Hawaiian royalty, dozens of attendants followed, bearing twenty kahili–feathered staff.

Read about this royal wedding in “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/