4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911

In the early 1900s, the Fourth of July could be a dangerous holiday. The American Medical Association cited 1,531 deaths on this Independence Day holiday between 1903 and 1910 from fireworks and other accidents. More than 5,000 injuries were reported in 1909 alone.

Because social groups and U.S. President Taft pled for a “Sane Fourth,” the holiday became safer. However, the Fourth of July today still sees firework injuries and threatening fires, which keeps police officers and firefighters busy. Read more about about it in 4th of July Celebrations, 1876-1911.

4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/4july.html


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/


May Day in Hawaii

Today in history — May 1, 1902 — Students from Royal School, Kamehameha School, Oahu College (Punahou School), and Kawaiahao Seminary sang for May Day. Boys from Kamehameha School sang Hawaiian melodies with orchestral music, and girls wore white dresses to school.

In Lahaina, Maui, children did the maypole march, raised the flag, and sang.

Read more about it in “The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina.”

“The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina”
Hawaiian star, May 2, 1902, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1902-05-02/ed-1/seq-7/


Earthy Poems for an Earthly Day

Love the earth through poetry!

The Tree Planter

He who plants a tree,
He plants love;
Tents of coolness spreading out
Above.

Heaven and earth help him
who plants a tree.
And his work its own reward shall be.

Cultivate your earthly love with more wooden poetry: “Who Plants a Tree.”

“Who Plants a Tree”
The Jasper news, April 28, 1921, Image 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90061052/1921-04-28/ed-1/seq-9/


St. Patrick’s Day in Honolulu

Today in history — St. Patrick’s Day 1914 — You didn’t need to be Irish to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day; you just needed to enjoy toasting to Saint Patrick.

On this day, Honolulu’s elites held and attended parties, which included green decorations, alcohol for toasting, food, and music. In these parties, people could be seen giving toast to Saint Patrick, and people singing Irish-themed songs (e.g. “My Dear Old Irish Mother”) and an orchestra playing could be heard. In fact, even the governor of Hawaii, Lucius Pinkham, attended a party and gave a brief toast. Read more about it in “Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet.”

“Good Irish and True Meet at St. Patrick’s Eve Banquet”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 17, 1914, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1914-03-17/ed-1/seq-7/


La Kuokoa o Hawaii Nei: Celebrating the Kingdom of Hawaii’s Independence

Today in history — November 28, 1860 — The Hawaiian Kingdom celebrated La Kuokoa o Hawaii nei. This national holiday commemorated France and the United Kingdom’s recognizing Hawaii as an independent state and “civilized” nation in 1843.

King Kamehameha IV received congratulations from consuls of the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. Read more about it in “Reception at the Palace.”

“Reception at the Palace”
Polynesian, December 1, 1860, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015408/1860-12-01/ed-1/seq-2/


Marriage of King Kamehameha IV & Emma Rooke

Queen Emma

This month in history — June 19, 1856: by marrying the king, Emma Rooke became Hawaii’s queen. For this national holiday, flags were hung on government buildings. Hours before, thousands of citizens arrived at the stone church where the ceremony would take place. However, more than half of them were turned away as the church could fit only 3,000 people.

Finally at 11:30 a.m., the crowd saw the twenty-year-old bride walk down the aisle: Emma in a white embroidered silk dress with her father and three bridesmaid (including the future Queen Liliuokalani). Crowned by a flower lei of white roses and orange flowers, the descendant of Hawaiian royalty looked straight at the altar through her bridal veil.

Donning a uniform and a sword, King Alexander LiholihoKing Kamehameha IV–marched with his father–the Royal Governor of Oahu.

King Kamehameha IV

Marking Hawaiian royalty, dozens of attendants followed, bearing twenty kahili–feathered staff.

Read about this royal wedding in “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/