1916 Thanksgiving in Honolulu

Thanksgiving 1916 — people in Honolulu attended church services, dinners (including luau) at schools and hospitals, and performances. Read more about it in “Thanksgiving in Honolulu Is Day Widely Observed.”

“Thanksgiving in Honolulu Is Day Widely Observed”
Honolulu star-bulletin, December 1, 1916, Page 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-12-01/ed-1/seq-8/

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Valentine’s Day in 1916

Valentine’s Day in 1916 meant afternoon and evening parties in Honolulu. Read about it in “Many Valentine Parties in Celebration of Happy Day.”

“Many Valentine Parties in Celebration of Happy Day”
Honolulu star-bulletin, February 14, 1916, SPORTS, CLASSIFIED AND SHIPPING, Page 12, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-02-14/ed-3/seq-4/


Chinese New Year in Prison

This month in history — January 1900 — Quarantined Chinese people in Hawaii wanted to celebrate their most important holiday: Chinese New Year. They requested from the government 25,000 fire crackers and one can of peanut oil, so they could blow them up at the Kakaako detention camp.

Read more about this Chinese New Year in“To Celebrate New Year’s” (far right).

“To Celebrate New Year’s”
The Hawaiian star, January 29, 1900, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1900-01-29/ed-1/seq-1/


4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911

In the early 1900s, the Fourth of July could be a dangerous holiday. The American Medical Association cited 1,531 deaths on this Independence Day holiday between 1903 and 1910 from fireworks and other accidents. More than 5,000 injuries were reported in 1909 alone.

Because social groups and U.S. President Taft pled for a “Sane Fourth,” the holiday became safer. However, the Fourth of July today still sees firework injuries and threatening fires, which keeps police officers and firefighters busy. Read more about about it in 4th of July Celebrations, 1876-1911.

4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/4july.html


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/


May Day in Hawaii

Today in history — May 1, 1902 — Students from Royal School, Kamehameha School, Oahu College (Punahou School), and Kawaiahao Seminary sang for May Day. Boys from Kamehameha School sang Hawaiian melodies with orchestral music, and girls wore white dresses to school.

In Lahaina, Maui, children did the maypole march, raised the flag, and sang.

Read more about it in “The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina.”

“The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina”
Hawaiian star, May 2, 1902, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1902-05-02/ed-1/seq-7/


Earthy Poems for an Earthly Day

Love the earth through poetry!

The Tree Planter

He who plants a tree,
He plants love;
Tents of coolness spreading out
Above.

Heaven and earth help him
who plants a tree.
And his work its own reward shall be.

Cultivate your earthly love with more wooden poetry: “Who Plants a Tree.”

“Who Plants a Tree”
The Jasper news, April 28, 1921, Image 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90061052/1921-04-28/ed-1/seq-9/