Marriage of Liliuokalani & John Dominis

Second couple from left: Lydia Paki, future Queen Liliuokalani, and John O. Dominis

Today in history — September 16, 1862 — Miss Lydia K. Paki, the future Queen Liliuokalani, married John O. Dominis:

Married — Dominis–Paki — In Honolulu, Tuesday evening, Sept. 16, at the residence of Chas. R. Bishop, Esq., by Rev. S. C. Damon, John O. Dominis, Esq., to Miss Lydia K. Paki.

Liliuokalani’s wedding
Pacific commercial advertiser, September 18, 1862, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1862-09-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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Prince Consort John Dominis’ Death

Today in history — August 27, 1891 —  the husband of Queen Liliuokalani, John Dominis died. Read more about the Royal Governor of Oahu and Prince Consort in “A Second Sorrow.”

“A Second Sorrow: Death of His Royal Highness the Prince Consort”
The Daily bulletin, August 28, 1891, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1891-08-28/ed-1/seq-3/


Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/


Princess Kaiulani’s Home Destroyed by Fire

Today in history — August 2, 1921 — a fire burned the late Princess Kaiulani’s home–Ainahau. An automatic gas heater next to a former kitchen ignited the fire. Film producer W. F. Adrich and his wife Peggy were residing in the Waikiki house, previously a hotel.

While the house is gone today, the location still honors Princess Kaiulani with the stone bench she sat on with writer Robert Louis Stevenson, a small triangular park, a bronze statue of her in the park, and the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.

Read more about the house in “Ainahau, Historic Old Landmark, Is Burned.”

“Ainahau, Historic Old Landmark, Is Burned”
The Garden Island, Aug. 9, 1921, P. 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015411/1921-08-09/ed-1/seq-8/


Liliuokalani Hosting a Reception in Washington, D.C.

This month in history —  July 1902 — Liliuokalani hosted a musicale and reception at the Ebbitt House in Washington, D.C. Guests included representatives and senators. Large palms and flowers decorated the rooms, and the orchestra played Hawaiian music.

Read more about this reception in “Music and Song for Her Invited Guests.”

“Music and Song for Her Invited Guests”
Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062245/1902-05-29/ed-1/seq-7/


Queen Kapiolani’s Funeral

This month in history — July 4, 1899 — Queen Kapiolani’s funeral. Flowers and kahili decorated Kawaiahao Church, and it was “crowded to its utmost.” To the organ’s melody, choirs sang solemn funeral selections such as Handel’s Largo.

To read more about the funeral of King Kalakaua’s wife, read “Passing of the Queen Dowager.”

The Hawaiian gazette, July 5, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-07-05/ed-1/seq-1/


King Kamehameha IV Marries Emma Rooke

Today in history–June 19, 1856–King Kamehameha IV married Emma Rooke. In a ceremony conducted in both Hawaiian and English, they exchanged their vows in front of 3,000 people and did something different:

“The kneeling of the royal bridegroom and his bride before the altar and exchanging their vows before the audience was so different from the simple custom usually observed here in marriage…”

Read more about this wedding in the article “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/