King Kamehameha IV Marries Emma Rooke

Today in history–June 19, 1856–King Kamehameha IV married Emma Rooke. In a ceremony conducted in both Hawaiian and English, they exchanged their vows in front of 3,000 people and did something different:

“The kneeling of the royal bridegroom and his bride before the altar and exchanging their vows before the audience was so different from the simple custom usually observed here in marriage…”

Read more about this wedding in the article “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/


The Conversion of Iolani Palace to a Government Building

This week in history — June 1893 — the Provisional Government converted Iolani Palace from a Hawaiian royalty residence to a government building.

A few months after the overthrow, Iolani Palace was now called the “Executive Building” for the Republic of Hawaii. Government offices moved in, redesigned the interior, and auctioned off the furniture and furnishings:

The old carved table upon which the bodies of the Kamehamehas were laid out after death was seen standing in the walk on the Ewa side of the building. It was tabu to the natives around the premises, and none of them would go near it or touch it. They did not seem to have the same fear of the tabu lately laid upon ‘the ex-queen’s palace’ by the kahunas to keep the haoles out …

Read more about it in “At the Capitol.”

The Hawaiian gazette, June 6, 1893, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1893-06-06/ed-1/seq-3/


Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha!

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha! The last child born from a reigning Hawaiian monarch entered the world with fanfare on May 20, 1858. A gun salute was heard around Honolulu. Raised flags and colorful streamers festooned homes and businesses. At Iolani Palace, children visited the newborn with gifts, including a baby carriage with an embroidered pillow and three silk flags.

Read more about the prince in “Prince Albert Kamehameha.”

Prince Albert Kamehameha
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/prince-albert-kamehameha/


King Kalakaua’s Silverware for Sale

This month in history — March 1916 — King Kalakaua’s silver knife and spoon and other “Hawaiian trinkets” were seen at a Los Angeles grocery window. The flatware was reportedly engraved with the monarch’s coat of arms.

Twenty-three years before after the overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy in 1893, royal heirlooms were sold off. Their whereabouts were unknown, and they included furniture, jewelry, fine China, sterling flatware, and paintings.

Read more about it in “Trinkets from Hawaii in Los Angeles Store Delight Street Goers.”

“Trinkets from Hawaii in Los Angeles Store Delight Street Goers”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 22, 1916, Page 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-03-22/ed-1/seq-4/


Queen Kapiolani, 52nd birtday, 1886.

Happy Birthday, Queen Kapiolani! Today in history — Dec. 31, 1834 — Kapiolani was born. On her fifty-second birthday, The Pacific Commercial Advertiser exclaimed, “… the Queen is one of the best exemplars in her own life and person of their potency and virtue.”

Read more about the Queen Consort in “The Queen’s Birthday.”

“The Queen’s Birthday” (first column from left, first article)
Pacific commercial advertiser, December 31, 1886, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1886-12-31/ed-1/seq-2/

nupepa

THE QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY.

Falling among the great Christian and universal holidays, the birthday of Queen Kapiolani comes opportunely for its celebration. Fifty-two years ago this day Queen Kapiolani was born. The times were then rude and the people untutored, but the dawn of a new and better civilization had broken upon this new life which was destined to rise to honor and distinction among her race and nation. Since Her Majesty’s birth marvellous changes have been worked in this country and the Queen is one of the best exemplars in her own life and person of their potency and virtue. The general public recognition of the birthday of Her Majesty Queen Kapiolani is due to her exalted station and personal character.

[It is essential to see how different people portrayed history, to get a clearer view of the past (and the present and future as well sometimes).]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser…

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La Kuokoa o Hawaii Nei: Celebrating the Kingdom of Hawaii’s Independence

Today in history — November 28, 1860 — The Hawaiian Kingdom celebrated La Kuokoa o Hawaii nei. This national holiday commemorated France and the United Kingdom’s recognizing Hawaii as an independent state and “civilized” nation in 1843.

King Kamehameha IV received congratulations from consuls of the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. Read more about it in “Reception at the Palace.”

“Reception at the Palace”
Polynesian, December 1, 1860, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015408/1860-12-01/ed-1/seq-2/


King Kalakaua’s Happy Returns

Happy Birthday David Laʻamea Kalakaua!

Entering the world near the Punchbowl Crater, the last king of Hawaii reigned from February 12, 1874 through January 20, 1891. The “Merrie Monarch” was known for throwing big parties for the entire kingdom and played an instrumental role in reviving Native Hawaiian arts, including hula. After his year-round trip in 1881, Kalakaua became the first king to travel around the world.

Read about how Kalakaua celebrated his fiftieth birthday in “King Kalakaua’s Silver Jubilee.”

King Kalakaua’s Silver Jubilee
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/king-kalakauas-silver-jubilee/