Queen Liliuokalani’s Mother-in-law Dies

This month in history — April 25, 1889 — Queen Liliuokalani’s mother-in-law, Mary Lambert Jones Dominis, died. She had a close relationship with her son, Prince Consort John Owen Dominis. Mrs. Dominis reportedly denigrated her non-Caucasian daughter-in-law, but, in her last years, appreciated Liliuokalani as a respectful wife to her son.

Read more about the owner of Washington Place (right image) in “Death of Mrs. Dominis.”

“Death of Mrs. Dominis: The Aged Mother of Ex-Governor Dominis Passes Away–Tokens of Respect”
Pacific commercial advertiser, April 26, 1889, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1889-04-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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Tribute to the Last Hawaiian Monarch

100 years ago today — November 11, 1917 — Queen Liliuokalani died. Dressed in a holoku of borcaded duchesse satin trimmed with rose-point lace, her body rested in state on a yellow-draped koa table in Kawaiahao Church. Hundreds of people went to pay tribute to Hawaii’s former head of state.

Read more about it in “Body of Hawaii’s Queen Rests in State.”

“Body of Hawaii’s Queen Rests in State”
Honolulu star-bulletin, November 13, 1917, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-11-13/ed-1/seq-2/


Marriage of Liliuokalani & John Dominis

Second couple from left: Lydia Paki, future Queen Liliuokalani, and John O. Dominis

Today in history — September 16, 1862 — Miss Lydia K. Paki, the future Queen Liliuokalani, married John O. Dominis:

Married — Dominis–Paki — In Honolulu, Tuesday evening, Sept. 16, at the residence of Chas. R. Bishop, Esq., by Rev. S. C. Damon, John O. Dominis, Esq., to Miss Lydia K. Paki.

Liliuokalani’s wedding
Pacific commercial advertiser, September 18, 1862, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1862-09-18/ed-1/seq-2/


Prince Consort John Dominis’ Death

Today in history — August 27, 1891 —  the husband of Queen Liliuokalani, John Dominis died. Read more about the Royal Governor of Oahu and Prince Consort in “A Second Sorrow.”

“A Second Sorrow: Death of His Royal Highness the Prince Consort”
The Daily bulletin, August 28, 1891, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1891-08-28/ed-1/seq-3/


Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/


Liliuokalani Hosting a Reception in Washington, D.C.

This month in history —  July 1902 — Liliuokalani hosted a musicale and reception at the Ebbitt House in Washington, D.C. Guests included representatives and senators. Large palms and flowers decorated the rooms, and the orchestra played Hawaiian music.

Read more about this reception in “Music and Song for Her Invited Guests.”

“Music and Song for Her Invited Guests”
Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062245/1902-05-29/ed-1/seq-7/


The Last Queen of Hawaii Died

Today in history — November 11, 1917 — Queen Liliuokalani died at age seventy-eight on a Sunday morning. Church bells rang in mourning. The Tacoma Times described her last years:

“… she has retired to her beautiful home here surrounded by a few chosen friends. … she has continued, in a limited way, the pomp and ceremony of the days when she was queen.”

Her nephew Prince Kuhio Kalanianaole stayed with her at her bedside.

Read more about it in “Queen Who Wrote Famous ‘Aloha’ Passes to Her Rest.”

“Queen Who Wrote Famous ‘Aloha’ Passes to Her Rest”
Tacoma times, November 12, 1917, Page 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1917-11-12/ed-1/seq-5/