Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/


Liliuokalani Hosting a Reception in Washington, D.C.

This month in history —  July 1902 — Liliuokalani hosted a musicale and reception at the Ebbitt House in Washington, D.C. Guests included representatives and senators. Large palms and flowers decorated the rooms, and the orchestra played Hawaiian music.

Read more about this reception in “Music and Song for Her Invited Guests.”

“Music and Song for Her Invited Guests”
Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062245/1902-05-29/ed-1/seq-7/


The Last Queen of Hawaii Died

Today in history — November 11, 1917 — Queen Liliuokalani died at age seventy-eight on a Sunday morning. Church bells rang in mourning. The Tacoma Times described her last years:

“… she has retired to her beautiful home here surrounded by a few chosen friends. … she has continued, in a limited way, the pomp and ceremony of the days when she was queen.”

Her nephew Prince Kuhio Kalanianaole stayed with her at her bedside.

Read more about it in “Queen Who Wrote Famous ‘Aloha’ Passes to Her Rest.”

“Queen Who Wrote Famous ‘Aloha’ Passes to Her Rest”
Tacoma times, November 12, 1917, Page 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1917-11-12/ed-1/seq-5/


Princess Kaiulani Named Successor to the Throne

This month in history — March 9, 1891 — Queen Liliuokalani proclaimed her niece Princess Kaiulani the successor to the Hawaiian throne. Outside, the Hawaiian battery and U.S. warships fired a royal salute. In the streets of Honolulu, heralds shouted in Hawaiian and English that Kaiulani is the heir apparent.

Read more about it in “The Succession: Princess Kaiulani Proclaimed Successor to the Hawaiian Throne.”

“The Succession: Princess Kaiulani Proclaimed Successor to the Hawaiian Throne”
The Daily bulletin, March 9, 1891
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1891-03-09/ed-1/seq-2/