Marriage of Liliuokalani & John Dominis

Second couple from left: Lydia Paki, future Queen Liliuokalani, and John O. Dominis

Today in history — September 16, 1862 — Miss Lydia K. Paki, the future Queen Liliuokalani, married John O. Dominis:

Married — Dominis–Paki — In Honolulu, Tuesday evening, Sept. 16, at the residence of Chas. R. Bishop, Esq., by Rev. S. C. Damon, John O. Dominis, Esq., to Miss Lydia K. Paki.

Liliuokalani’s wedding
Pacific commercial advertiser, September 18, 1862, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1862-09-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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Hawaiian Women: The Most Eligible Bachelorettes?

The New York Sun claimed Rose Davison, Hawaii’s representative at the Pan-American fair, said all Hawaiian girls were beautiful, were heiresses, and were waiting for American youths to propose marriage to them. Davison denied saying that, but received tons of letters from interested men, such as the following:

“You say the [Hawaiian] girls are very wealthy. There are nice men … who would trade color for wealth in this country; but very few of them have money to take them to Hawaii. Could they only meet both their conditions might be bettered.”

Read more about it in “Wanted as Wives.”

“Wanted as Wives: American Hearts Fired by Tale of Beautiful Hawaiian Heiresses”
Albuquerque daily citizen, Aug. 19, 1902, P. 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020613/1902-08-19/ed-1/seq-4/


Marriage of King Kamehameha IV & Emma Rooke

Queen Emma

This month in history — June 19, 1856: by marrying the king, Emma Rooke became Hawaii’s queen. For this national holiday, flags were hung on government buildings. Hours before, thousands of citizens arrived at the stone church where the ceremony would take place. However, more than half of them were turned away as the church could fit only 3,000 people.

Finally at 11:30 a.m., the crowd saw the twenty-year-old bride walk down the aisle: Emma in a white embroidered silk dress with her father and three bridesmaid (including the future Queen Liliuokalani). Crowned by a flower lei of white roses and orange flowers, the descendant of Hawaiian royalty looked straight at the altar through her bridal veil.

Donning a uniform and a sword, King Alexander LiholihoKing Kamehameha IV–marched with his father–the Royal Governor of Oahu.

King Kamehameha IV

Marking Hawaiian royalty, dozens of attendants followed, bearing twenty kahili–feathered staff.

Read about this royal wedding in “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/