Princess Kaiulani’s Funeral

Today in history — March 12, 1899 — thousands of people visited Princess Kaiulani’s body in Kawaiahao Church to see her one last time. After the funeral service, a procession went from King Street to the Mausoleum, and 25,000 people watched the hearse surrounded by carriages pass by. Military men, clergies, pall bearers, kahili bearers, and torch bearers followed. In the Royal Mausoleum, Princess Kaiulani was laid to rest with her mother Princess Likelike.

Read more about it in “Princess Kaiulani Is Laid to Rest.”

“Princess Kaiulani Is Laid to Rest”
The Hawaiian star, March 13, 1899, Image 1


Princess Kaiulani’s Death

Today in history — March 6, 1899 — Princess Kaiulani died at age 23 in her Ainahau home. Sadness enclosed Hawaii. Many spoke of Kaiulani as gentle, generous, gracious, and unassuming. A stream of carriages visited her home, and family and friends mourned with her father Archibald Scott Cleghorn and brought flowers. Government building flags flew half-mast. Read more about it in “Day of Sorrow.”

“Day of Sorrow: All Grieved to Learn of Kaiulani’s Death”
Pacific commercial advertiser, March 7, 1899, Image 1

King Kalakaua’s Death

Today in history — January 21, 1891 — King Kalakaua died at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco.

In December 1890, King Kalakaua took his last trip to San Francisco, never to see home again. A doctor recommended the ill king to seek medical treatment in San Francisco, California. Unfortunately, Kalakaua’s health worsened, and he died of Bright’s disease.

Read about the Hawaiian Kingdom’s bereavement in “King Kalakaua Dead.”

“King Kalakaua Dead”
Hawaiian gazette, February 3, 1891, Image 1


Tribute to the Last Hawaiian Monarch

100 years ago today — November 11, 1917 — Queen Liliuokalani died. Dressed in a holoku of borcaded duchesse satin trimmed with rose-point lace, her body rested in state on a yellow-draped koa table in Kawaiahao Church. Hundreds of people went to pay tribute to Hawaii’s former head of state.

Read more about it in “Body of Hawaii’s Queen Rests in State.”

“Body of Hawaii’s Queen Rests in State”
Honolulu star-bulletin, November 13, 1917, Image 2


Prince Kuhio Ordered to Leave

This week in history – November 1903 — Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole and his wife were  asked to leave a theatre box because he was a “negro.” Read more about it in “Kuhio Ordered from Theater Box.”

“Kuhio Ordered from Theater Box”
Pacific commercial advertiser, November 14, 1903, Page 8, Image 9


Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17


Princess Kaiulani’s Home Destroyed by Fire

Today in history — August 2, 1921 — a fire burned the late Princess Kaiulani’s home–Ainahau. An automatic gas heater next to a former kitchen ignited the fire. Film producer W. F. Adrich and his wife Peggy were residing in the Waikiki house, previously a hotel.

While the house is gone today, the location still honors Princess Kaiulani with the stone bench she sat on with writer Robert Louis Stevenson, a small triangular park, a bronze statue of her in the park, and the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.

Read more about the house in “Ainahau, Historic Old Landmark, Is Burned.”

“Ainahau, Historic Old Landmark, Is Burned”
The Garden Island, Aug. 9, 1921, P. 8