Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/

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Princess Kaiulani’s Home Destroyed by Fire

Today in history — August 2, 1921 — a fire burned the late Princess Kaiulani’s home–Ainahau. An automatic gas heater next to a former kitchen ignited the fire. Film producer W. F. Adrich and his wife Peggy were residing in the Waikiki house, previously a hotel.

While the house is gone today, the location still honors Princess Kaiulani with the stone bench she sat on with writer Robert Louis Stevenson, a small triangular park, a bronze statue of her in the park, and the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.

Read more about the house in “Ainahau, Historic Old Landmark, Is Burned.”

“Ainahau, Historic Old Landmark, Is Burned”
The Garden Island, Aug. 9, 1921, P. 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015411/1921-08-09/ed-1/seq-8/


Liliuokalani Hosting a Reception in Washington, D.C.

This month in history —  July 1902 — Liliuokalani hosted a musicale and reception at the Ebbitt House in Washington, D.C. Guests included representatives and senators. Large palms and flowers decorated the rooms, and the orchestra played Hawaiian music.

Read more about this reception in “Music and Song for Her Invited Guests.”

“Music and Song for Her Invited Guests”
Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062245/1902-05-29/ed-1/seq-7/


Queen Kapiolani’s Funeral

This month in history — July 4, 1899 — Queen Kapiolani’s funeral. Flowers and kahili decorated Kawaiahao Church, and it was “crowded to its utmost.” To the organ’s melody, choirs sang solemn funeral selections such as Handel’s Largo.

To read more about the funeral of King Kalakaua’s wife, read “Passing of the Queen Dowager.”

The Hawaiian gazette, July 5, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-07-05/ed-1/seq-1/


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/


Princess Ruth Keʻelikōlani Died

Today in history — May 24, 1883 — Princess Ruth Luka Keanolani Kauanahoahoa Keʻelikōlani died at age 56. Born in 1826, Keʻelikōlani (“leaf bud of heaven”) served as Royal Governor of the Island of Hawaii. Throughout her life, Keʻelikōlani defended the Hawaiian culture.

As a grandchild of Kamehameha I, Keʻelikōlani served as the primary heir to the Kamehameha family. Thus, When she died, Keʻelikōlani was the richest woman in Hawaii and owned almost nine percent of the land in Hawaii.

Through Keʻelikōlani’s will, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bernice Bishop inherited 353,000 acres of Kamehameha Lands and became the largest private landowner in Hawaii. After Pauahi died, her husband Charles Reed Bishop executed her will and used her land to create the Bishop Museum, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate and Kamehameha Schools.

Read more about it in “Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.”

“Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani”
The Daily bulletin, May 28, 1883, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1883-05-28/ed-1/seq-2/


Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha!

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha! The last child born from a reigning Hawaiian monarch entered the world with fanfare on May 20, 1858. A gun salute was heard around Honolulu. Raised flags and colorful streamers festooned homes and businesses. At Iolani Palace, children visited the newborn with gifts, including a baby carriage with an embroidered pillow and three silk flags.

Read more about the prince in “Prince Albert Kamehameha.”

Prince Albert Kamehameha
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/prince-albert-kamehameha/