Liliuokalani Hosting a Reception in Washington, D.C.

This month in history —  July 1902 — Liliuokalani hosted a musicale and reception at the Ebbitt House in Washington, D.C. Guests included representatives and senators. Large palms and flowers decorated the rooms, and the orchestra played Hawaiian music.

Read more about this reception in “Music and Song for Her Invited Guests.”

“Music and Song for Her Invited Guests”
Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062245/1902-05-29/ed-1/seq-7/


Queen Kapiolani’s Funeral

This month in history — July 4, 1899 — Queen Kapiolani’s funeral. Flowers and kahili decorated Kawaiahao Church, and it was “crowded to its utmost.” To the organ’s melody, choirs sang solemn funeral selections such as Handel’s Largo.

To read more about the funeral of King Kalakaua’s wife, read “Passing of the Queen Dowager.”

The Hawaiian gazette, July 5, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-07-05/ed-1/seq-1/


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/


Princess Ruth Keʻelikōlani Died

Today in history — May 24, 1883 — Princess Ruth Luka Keanolani Kauanahoahoa Keʻelikōlani died at age 56. Born in 1826, Keʻelikōlani (“leaf bud of heaven”) served as Royal Governor of the Island of Hawaii. Throughout her life, Keʻelikōlani defended the Hawaiian culture.

As a grandchild of Kamehameha I, Keʻelikōlani served as the primary heir to the Kamehameha family. Thus, When she died, Keʻelikōlani was the richest woman in Hawaii and owned almost nine percent of the land in Hawaii.

Through Keʻelikōlani’s will, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bernice Bishop inherited 353,000 acres of Kamehameha Lands and became the largest private landowner in Hawaii. After Pauahi died, her husband Charles Reed Bishop executed her will and used her land to create the Bishop Museum, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate and Kamehameha Schools.

Read more about it in “Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.”

“Death of Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani”
The Daily bulletin, May 28, 1883, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1883-05-28/ed-1/seq-2/


Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha!

Happy birthday, Prince Albert Kamehameha! The last child born from a reigning Hawaiian monarch entered the world with fanfare on May 20, 1858. A gun salute was heard around Honolulu. Raised flags and colorful streamers festooned homes and businesses. At Iolani Palace, children visited the newborn with gifts, including a baby carriage with an embroidered pillow and three silk flags.

Read more about the prince in “Prince Albert Kamehameha.”

Prince Albert Kamehameha
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/prince-albert-kamehameha/


Queen Kapiolani, 52nd birtday, 1886.

Happy Birthday, Queen Kapiolani! Today in history — Dec. 31, 1834 — Kapiolani was born. On her fifty-second birthday, The Pacific Commercial Advertiser exclaimed, “… the Queen is one of the best exemplars in her own life and person of their potency and virtue.”

Read more about the Queen Consort in “The Queen’s Birthday.”

“The Queen’s Birthday” (first column from left, first article)
Pacific commercial advertiser, December 31, 1886, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1886-12-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY.

Falling among the great Christian and universal holidays, the birthday of Queen Kapiolani comes opportunely for its celebration. Fifty-two years ago this day Queen Kapiolani was born. The times were then rude and the people untutored, but the dawn of a new and better civilization had broken upon this new life which was destined to rise to honor and distinction among her race and nation. Since Her Majesty’s birth marvellous changes have been worked in this country and the Queen is one of the best exemplars in her own life and person of their potency and virtue. The general public recognition of the birthday of Her Majesty Queen Kapiolani is due to her exalted station and personal character.

[It is essential to see how different people portrayed history, to get a clearer view of the past (and the present and future as well sometimes).]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser…

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Pau Hana for Hawaii’s Sugar King

This week in history  — December 26, 1908 — Hawaii’s “sugar king,” Claus Spreckels, died after a brief illness. As one of the ten richest Americans, Spreckels dominated the sugar industries on the U.S. West Coast and in Hawaii from mid-1800s until his death. In Hawaii, he owned a plantation town, Spreckelsville, Maui; and incorporated Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC&S).

Today, the name “Matson” is synonymous with Hawaii’s shipping industry–a lifeline for the world’s most isolated population center. In its early years, Spreckels financed William Matson’s ships for his new shipping company.

Spreckels gave loans and bribes to King Kalakaua and cabinet members. In return, Spreckels got land and water rights. The water rights for the Northeast Maui streams included complete ownership and control over the water. He irrigated the water to Spreckelsville plantation.

Read more about the “sugar king” in “Hardy Pioneer and Benefactor of State Died.”

“Hardy Pioneer and Benefactor of State Died”
The San Francisco call, Dec. 27, 1908, Page 18
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1908-12-27/ed-1/seq-18/