Duke Kahanamoku’s Birthday

Happy birthday Duke Paoa Kahanamoku! Today in history — August 24, 1890 — the future first Native Hawaiian gold medalist was born.

As a grown up, Kahanamoku broke the world record in swimming and popularized surfing in mainland United States and Australia.

Read more about him in “Duke Kahanamoku in U.S. Newspapers.”

Duke Kahanamoku in U.S. Newspapers
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/duke-kahanamoku-in-u-s-newspapers/

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Automobile News

Horses, carriages, and bicycles ruled the dirt roads in Honolulu before 1899. On October 8, 1899, people watched Henry P. Baldwin and Edward D. Tenney drive Hawaii’s first “horseless car” around town. In 1906, Hawaii issued its first driver’s license.

Afterwards, automobile sections appeared in Hawaii newspapers. They included automobile news, such as automobile sales, automobile races, lists of motor vehicle registrations and new automobile models, and automobile ads. Read more.


Father Damien’s Arrival in Hawaii

Today in history — May 10, 1873 — Father Damien and his bishop arrived at Kalaupapa, where leprosy victims lived in exile.

Dedicating his life to serving those victims, Father Damien encouraged civility through establishing laws, constructed buildings, coffins, and a water system, planted trees, encouraged the government to provide more resources, and boosted morale. The Belgian missionary priest’s selflessness made him famous internationally.

Read more about it in Hawaii in “Leprosy.”

Leprosy
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/leprosy/


Jules Tavernier: The Volcano Artist

Today in history — April 27, 1844 — Hawaiian volcano artist Jules Tavernier was born in Paris, France. Although he lived only his final five years in Hawaii, Tavernier painted as the most significant artist in Hawaii’s Volcano School (non-native Hawaiian artists who painted night scenes of Hawaii’s erupting volcanoes).
Beyond the jagged cliffs of Kilauea Volcano, the Halemaumau lava lake’s orange red glow illuminates the night (left image). Above, smoke shrouds the lake, and a full moon peeks behind grayish black clouds.

To paint this picture, in 1887, Jules Tavernier (1844-1889) made a grueling one-to-two day journey on horseback up to Kilauea’s peak.

Although the English French artist spent less than five years in Hawaii, Tavernier is considered the most significant artist in Hawaii’s Volcano School … Read more

Jules Tavernier: The Volcano Artist
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/jules-tavernier-the-volcano-artist/


Emil Melville’s Balloon Ride

Up, up and away! This month in history–March 1889–before airplanes, hot-air balloons were becoming popular.

In Hawaii, Emil Melville would attempt the first human flight and first manned ascent on a balloon, perform acrobatic stunts, and hang from a trapeze.

How did Mr. Melville’s attempt go? Find out by reading “Emil Melville’s Balloon Ride.”

https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/emil-melvilles-balloon-ride/


First Public Airport

Today in history–March 21, 1927–Hawaii’s first official civilian airfield, John Rodgers Airport, was dedicated. It was renamed Honolulu International Airport and became among the busiest U.S. airports with over 21 million passengers per year.

Read more about how people Hawaii traveled in “Trans-Pacific Travel.”

Trans-Pacific Travel
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/trans-pacific-travel/


Duke Paoa Kahanamoku Died

Today in history — January 22, 1890 — Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku died. He was a five-time Olympic medalist in swimming and surfer who made surfing popular on the U.S. Mainland.

Read more about him in “Duke Kahanamoku.”

Duke Kahanamoku
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/duke-kahanamoku-in-u-s-newspapers/