President Lincoln’s Assassination

Today in history — April 15, 1865 — President Abraham Lincoln died — John Wilkes Booth shot him while he watched a show in Ford’s Theater. A nine-car funeral train carried the President’s body to Springfield, Illinois, where he was buried on May 4.

Many of the co-conspirators were captured, and on April 24, John Wilkes Booth was shot in a farm in Bowling Green, VA, and died three hours later. The co-conspirators also tried to kill Secretary Seward and Vice President Johnson and were tried and convicted.

Read more about it in “Lincoln Assassination.”

Lincoln Assassination
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/lincoln.html

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Queen Liliuokalani on the Day Her Country Lost Independence

Today in history — “On the morning of August 12, 1898, troops from the warship USS Philadelphia marched ashore for the ceremony at Iolani Palace formally recognizing the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands by the United States. lowering the Hawaiian flag in 1898.

“On the morning of August 12, 1898, a ceremony at Iolani Palace marked the U.S. annexation of Hawaii. The Royal Hawaiian Band played Hawaii Ponoi as the Hawaiian flag went down and The Star-Spangled Banner as the American flag went up.”

What was Queen Liliuokalani doing? She stayed in her home, Washington Place, with family members and loyalists:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/


Hawaiian Islands for Sale?

This month in history — December 1854 — King Kamehameha III was rumored to offer to sell the Hawaiian islands to the United States. The price: a pension of $300,000 (about $7.5 million today) per year. The Grand River Times from Michigan’s newspaper commented,

That these islands will eventually be incorporated into our Union is beyond a question, but not on such exorbitant and indefinite terms.–There is a possibility, if not a probability, that the heir ‘apparent’ may live fifty years, and it is scarcely to be supposed that our Government would lay itself liable to give him twelve times the salary of the President during this period.

Read more about this rumor in “Purchase of the Sandwich Islands.”

“Purchase of the Sandwich Islands”
Grand River times, December 20, 1854, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026466/1854-12-20/ed-1/seq-1/

The Apology Resolution

Today in history–Nov. 23, 1993–US President Bill Clinton signed the “Apology Resolution.” United States Public Law 103-150 apologized on behalf of the United States for its role in the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy.

Read about Hawaii becoming the fiftieth state: “Statehood.”

Statehood
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/statehood/


Duke Kahanamoku’s Birthday

Happy birthday Duke Paoa Kahanamoku! Today in history — August 24, 1890 — the future first Native Hawaiian gold medalist was born.

As a grown up, Kahanamoku broke the world record in swimming and popularized surfing in mainland United States and Australia.

Read more about him in “Duke Kahanamoku in U.S. Newspapers.”

Duke Kahanamoku in U.S. Newspapers
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/duke-kahanamoku-in-u-s-newspapers/


Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/