Business Section

Business in Hawaii is pretty unique. Aloha shirt is considered formal wear. The high school you graduated from matters. Even though Pidgin (Hawaii Creole English) is often disparaged, it might give you an advantage with networking.

Business and capitalism as a whole didn’t always exist in Hawaii. Ancient Hawaiians ran a feudalist society with a subsistence economy based on the ahapuaa (the land division based on the water sources that ran from mountain to sea). After Captain James Cook arrived in 1778 and made European contact, foreigners started coming to Hawaii and engaging in trade with the Hawaiian people. Hawaii’s economy evolved into a capitalist one, with the industries including the sandalwood trade, whaling, agriculture (sugar, pineapple, coffee), and tourism.
The New York Herald published the first business section in a daily newspaper, a money page, in 1835, and other daily U.S. newspapers eventually followed suit, including Hawaii’s establishment (conservative) newspapers in the late 1800s. Many of reported business and financial news catering to businessmen and included a list of stock exchange prices for local companies and news about major agricultural industries (e.g. sugar).

The following Hawaii newspapers ran a business section in the late 1800s and/or early 1900s.

– Alice Kim

Search Strategies – Newspapers with Business Sections
Evening Bulletin – “In Business Circles”

newspaper: Evening Bulletin, phrase: “in business circles”

Hawaiian Gazette – “Commercial News”

Newspaper: Hawaiian Gazette, Phrase: Commercial News

The Hawaiian Star – “Financial and Commercial News”

Newspaper: Hawaiian Star, Phrase: commercial news

Honolulu Star-Bulletin – “Commercial News”

Newspaper: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Phrase: Commercial News

Newspaper: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, with the phrase: “business and financial news”

Honolulu Star-Bulletin – “In Business Circles—News and Review”

newspaper: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, phrase: in business circles, within 5 words: news review

Advertisements


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s