Japanese Shop Ads

Today, for Japanese goods, Hawaii has Shirokiya, Don Quijote, Nijiya Market, and Marukai. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, Hawaii didn’t have those stores, but it did have other Japanese stores.

Japanese and Okinawan people immigrated to Hawaii in droves from the late 1800s, creating a demand for goods from their homeland. Those goods included lacquer ware, bamboo ware, stone and copper lanterns, granite towers, and bronze ware, and dry goods included silk, shirts, pajamas, and kimono.

Hence, Japanese stores popped up in downtown Honolulu and plantations. Reflecting the Japanese collective culture of honoring the family, these shops were usually named after the owners’ family names: Furuya, Ozaki, Kobayashi, Murakami, Iwakami, Hamano, and Isoshima. These shops enabled the Japanese continue to live their native culture and the Okinawans to adopt the dominant Japanese culture.

– Alice Kim

“What we sell: Silk Dress Goods, Japanese Dry Goods, Cotton Crape. Iwakami, Robinson Block, Hotel St.”
Japanese Store Iwakami Ad
The Hawaiian star, October 4, 1895, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1895-10-04/ed-1/seq-2/

Pacific commercial advertiser, February 13, 1900
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1900-02-13/ed-1/seq-3/

“Japanese Curios. K. Kobayashi 206 Merchant St. opposite Hawaiian News Co.”
The Hawaiian star, October 4, 1895, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1895-10-04/ed-1/seq-2/

Japanese Spaniel
Honolulu star-bulletin, December 19, 1917
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-12-19/ed-2/seq-16/

Japanese Noodles
The Hawaiian star, November 28, 1908
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1908-11-28/ed-1/seq-2/

Itohan
The Daily bulletin, June 16, 1894, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1894-06-16/ed-1/seq-4/

Awata Vases at K. Furuya
Evening bulletin, December 23, 1895, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1895-12-23/ed-1/seq-3/

Ozaki Store
Pacific commercial advertiser, February 13, 1900
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1900-02-13/ed-1/seq-3/

“Holiday Gifts. A Complete Stock of Oriental Novelties. The Japanese Bazaar. Fort St., opp. Catholic Church.”
Honolulu star-bulletin, December 12, 1917, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-12-12/ed-2/seq-7/

Sayegusa
Honolulu star-bulletin, January 25, 1917
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-01-25/ed-1/seq-8/

“New Japanese Store. K. Kobayashi. Japanese Dry and Fancy Goods, Lacquered Ware, Crockery and Bamboo Ware, Etc., Etc. At Lowest Prices. 420 Nuuanu Street, opposite Love’s Bakery.”
The Hawaiian star, October 12, 1895, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1895-10-12/ed-1/seq-2/

Iwakami
The Hawaiian star, July 6, 1908, Page 11
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1908-07-06/ed-1/seq-11/

K. Isoshima
Evening bulletin, October 23, 1900, Page 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1900-10-23/ed-1/seq-6/

concrete and mason work
Evening bulletin, October 9, 1909
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1909-10-09/ed-1/seq-13/

Honolulu star-bulletin, January 25, 1917
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1917-01-25/ed-1/seq-8/

Chiya Kimono
The Pacific commercial advertiser, June 13, 1900, Page 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1900-06-13/ed-1/seq-5/

Chiya’s
Pacific commercial advertiser, May 5, 1902
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1902-05-05/ed-1/seq-6/

H. Hamano Japanese Importer
Evening bulletin, April 24, 1903
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1903-04-24/ed-1/seq-5/

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