Mosquitoes in Hawaii

Timeline

1826: The first mosquitoes, southern house mosquitoes, were introduced to Hawaii. A foreign ship in Lahaina Harbor likely brought them in, and the mosquitoes quickly bred in Hawaii’s tropical, humid climate. Four more mosquito species would be introduced to Hawaii in the next 150 years.

After 1826: Likely imported by non-native birds, avian pox arrived. The mosquitoes transmitted it to the native bird population. The native birds did not encounter mosquito-borne diseases during their evolution and, thus, did not have immunity. The disease accelerated the sharp decline in the lowland native bird population.

1900s: Avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum), the second mosquito-borne, avian disease imported by non-native birds, arrived. The mosquitoes quickly spread this disease, which further decimated the lowland native bird population. Thus, several native bird species went extinct. Now the remaining bird population live solely in higher elevation, because the colder temperatures discourage mosquitoes.

Search Strategy
select state: Hawaii, with any of the words: mosquito

Articles from Chronicling America

“A Great Showing for Anti-Mosquito Crusade”
Hawaiian gazette, August 2, 1904, Image 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1904-08-02/ed-1/seq-6/

“Honolulu’s Danger: The Murderous Mosquito”
Evening bulletin, May 20, 1911, 3:30 EDITION, Page 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1911-05-20/ed-1/seq-9/

“A Word as to Mosquitoes”
Hilo tribune, May 23, 1902, Image 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016339/1902-05-23/ed-1/seq-8/

“Methods Employed to Kill Mosquitos”
Hilo tribune, August 22, 1905, Page 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016339/1905-08-22/ed-1/seq-6/

“Sanitary Expert Lays Stress on Necessity for Mosquito War”
Honolulu star-bulletin, March 22, 1913, 3:30 Edition, Page 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-03-22/ed-1/seq-17/

“Mosquito Campaign Proved Success by Official Report”
Evening bulletin, July 30, 1904, 2:30 O’CLOCK EDITION, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1904-07-30/ed-1/seq-3/

“The Mosquito Campaign”
Hawaiian star, July 24, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Page 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1905-07-24/ed-1/seq-4/

“The Mosquito Pest” (editorial)
Garden Island, August 1, 1916, Page 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015411/1916-08-01/ed-1/seq-2/

“Songs of the Mosquito Sung to Garbage Man”
Honolulu star-bulletin, October 18, 1913, 3:30 Edition, Page 18
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-10-18/ed-1/seq-18/

“Famous Yellow Fever Fight Commends Work in Honolulu”
Honolulu star-bulletin, April 5, 1913, 3:30 Edition, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-04-05/ed-1/seq-7/

“Death Knell for Mosquito: Pest Must Be Destroyed or Yellow Fever Will Devestate Islands”
Hawaiian gazette, November 18, 1910, Page 7, Image 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1910-11-18/ed-1/seq-9/

“Farewell Mosquito”
Hawaiian star, July 30, 1904, Page 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1904-07-30/ed-1/seq-4/>

“Rice Fields Not a Menace”
Hawaiian gazette, December 31, 1907, Image 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1907-12-31/ed-1/seq-5/

“How the Mosquito Came to Infest These Islands”
Hawaiian gazette, April 17, 1903, Image 6
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1903-04-17/ed-1/seq-6/

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