Pacific Commercial Advertiser’s Hawaiian Section

In its first two and a half months, on its last page, The Pacific Commercial Advertiser ran a Hawaiian-language section, “Ka Hoku Loa o Hawaii” (The Morning Star of Hawaii). Having grown up in Waimea, Maui, and Lahaina, Maui, PCA publisher Henry Martyn Whitney was fluent in Hawaii and wrote most of the Hawaiian-language page’s content under his Hawaiianized name, “Heneri M. Wini.”

In an earlier issue, Whitney wrote in Hawaiian, “Aloha, o you close friends living in the towns, the country, the valleys and beaches from Hawaii to Kauai. Great aloha to you. Behold today there is opening the dawn of the Morning Star of Hawaii, to be a torch illuminating your home …” He said that the articles aimed “to encourage industry and an improvement in the domestic and social habits of the native race will be prepared by persons well fitted for the task.” Whitney wanted the readers to develop a “critical taste” and invited contributions about the history, geography, and nature of Hawaii and nearby Pacific islands.

Whitney did say that the Hawaiian-language page might not survive long. After it ran for two and a half months, on September 25, 1856, Whitney announced that he would discontinue the Hawaiian-language page because the newspaper needed space for foreigners when whaling ships arrive in Hawaii.

Whitney said he would resume running the page three months later and the subscribers who prepaid the $6 yearly subscription would have $4 credited to the page’s future publications. Instead, after five years, Whitney would publish an entire Hawaiian-language newspaper, Ka Nupepa Kuokoa.

– Alice Kim

Ka Hoku Loa o Hawaii in Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser., July 02, 1856, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-4/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., July 10, 1856, Native Edition, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-10/ed-1/seq-1/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., July 31, 1856, Native Edition, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-31/ed-1/seq-4/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., August 07, 1856, Native Edition, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-08-07/ed-1/seq-4/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., August 14, 1856, Native Edition, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-08-14/ed-1/seq-1/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., August 21, 1856, Native Edition, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-08-21/ed-1/seq-1/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., September 04, 1856, Native Edition, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-09-04/ed-1/seq-4/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., September 11, 1856, Native Edition, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-09-11/ed-1/seq-1/

The Pacific commercial advertiser., September 18, 1856, Native Edition, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-09-18/ed-1/seq-1/

Source

Chaplin, George. Presstime in Paradise: The Life and Times of The Honolulu Advertiser, 1856-1995. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1998.

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