The First Motorcycle in Hawaii

Today in history–February 15, 1901–the motorcycle debuted in Hawaii. Mr. Whitman, manager of the Tribune bicycle agency, took the very first spin around downtown Honolulu and Waikiki. Read about the first motorcycle ride in Hawaii in “First Motorcycles in Hawaii.”

First Motorcycles in Hawaii
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/first-motorcycles-in-hawaii/


Badminton

Badminton is the world’s fastest racket sport; shuttlecocks travel up to 200 miles per hour. Invented by British military officers in India in the mid-1800s, badminton soon spread to the rest of the world.

Though badminton clubs sprouted up in the United States in the late 19th century, the sport never really took off on the competitive level in America, as it was overshadowed by the more popular racket sport, tennis.

Read more about Badminton’s history in “Badminton.”

Badminton
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/badminton.html


First Comics in Hawaii Newspapers

Today in history–January 30, 1904–the first comic strips in Hawaii debuted in the Evening Bulletin.

In color, the first comics consisted of seven multi-panel strips of comedic cartoons, such as the following:

Earlier comics appeared in North American newspapers in the late 1800s.

Probably due to the lack of interest, the Evening Bulletin eventually stopped publishing comics. However, comic strips would eventually reappear in Hawaii’s newspapers, such as the Honolulu Star-Advertiser today.

The First Comic Strips

Evening bulletin, Jan. 30, 1904, Image 9
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http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1904-01-30/ed-1/seq-12/

Search Strategy
After the Evening Bulletin’s January 30, 1904, the comic strips appeared every other Saturday.

Duke Paoa Kahanamoku Died

Today in history — January 22, 1890 — Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku died. He was a five-time Olympic medalist in swimming and surfer who made surfing popular on the U.S. Mainland.

Read more about him in “Duke Kahanamoku.”

Duke Kahanamoku
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/duke-kahanamoku-in-u-s-newspapers/


Chinatown Fires Topic Guide

Today in history — Jan. 20, 1900 — Board of Health started a “plague cleansing” fire in Chinatown that burned for 17 days.

The paper reported: “Chinatown that was is a scene of desolation today. Every frame building, the Independent office excepted, has been burned to the ground.”

Another article began: “Dr. C. B. Wood, president of the Board of Health … answered: ‘I consider the situation as more encouraging than at any time since the first case of plague was discovered. We have things just as we had wanted all along. […]There is no more Chinatown. its Infected buildings and merchandise are burned’.”

Read about it in our topic guide.

The Chinatown Fires
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/the-chinatown-fires/


Korean Immigration to Hawaii

Today in history — January 13, 1903 — the first large group of Korean immigrants arrived in America. Fifty-six men, twenty-one women, and twenty-five children sailed on the RMS Gaelic and landed in Hawaii. Many of them would work in the sugar plantations.

Within two years, more than 7,000 Korean immigrants arrived in Hawaii.

Read more about it in “Koreans Arriving.”

“Koreans Arriving: A Large Party Come by  the Gaelic”
The Hawaiian star, January 13, 1903, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1903-01-13/ed-1/seq-1/


Election of King Lunalilo

This week in history — January 8, 1873 — Hawaii celebrated William Charles Lunalilo’s election as the king of Hawaii.

Signs on storefront proclaimed “Long Live William C. Lunalilo, Our King!” and “Lunalilo the People’s King! and W. C. Lunalilo the King of Hearts!” Hours before the legislature met, a crowd of people gathered around the courthouse. When Lunalilo arrived, they cheered for him.

Read more about Lunalilo’s election in “Election of Prince Lunalilo as King!”

“Election of Prince Lunalilo as King!: Immense Enthusiasm!”
The Pacific commercial advertiser., January 11, 1873, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1873-01-11/ed-1/seq-4/