Father Damien’s Arrival in Hawaii

Today in history — May 10, 1873 — Father Damien and his bishop arrived at Kalaupapa, where leprosy victims lived in exile.

Dedicating his life to serving those victims, Father Damien encouraged civility through establishing laws, constructed buildings, coffins, and a water system, planted trees, encouraged the government to provide more resources, and boosted morale. The Belgian missionary priest’s selflessness made him famous internationally.

Read more about it in Hawaii in “Leprosy.”

Leprosy
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/leprosy/


Rebuilding Public Trust in the Media

Looking to the Future: Rebuilding Public Trust in the Media
George Chaplin Fellowship in Distinguished Journalism Address featuring Elizabeth Jensen
May 8, 5:00pm – 7:00pm
Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, Manoa Grand Ballroom, 2454 S. Beretania St.

Trust in the media has steeply declined in the past several decades, even as surveys show that the public believes democracy requires the press to keep government institutions honest. Thanks in part to social media, news consumers are increasingly retreating into their own partisan political bubbles, while a flood of fake news muddles the national debate. Solutions may be at hand, however, as new research identifies elements that go into making media that the public finds trustworthy.

As NPR’s Ombudsman/Public Editor, Elizabeth Jensen serves as the public’s representative, bringing transparency to matters of journalism and ethics. Over her three decades in the field, Jensen has reported on journalistic decision-making, mergers and acquisitions, content, institutional transformations, the media-politics nexus, and advertising for The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal and numerous others.

Jensen’s Chaplin address marks the 50th year of EWC media programs, which began with the Jefferson Fellowships program for journalists in 1967. The George Chaplin Fellowship in Distinguished Journalism was established in 1986 to honor the leadership and ideals of longtime Honolulu Advertiser Editor-in-chief George Chaplin.

Reception to follow. No host cocktails. Aloha attire.

Free and open to the public. Limited seating.
R.S.V.P. (808) 944-7111 / ewcinfo@EastWestCenter.org

Validated parking will be available for $6 in the JCCH parking structure.

Event Sponsors
East-West Center and Hawaii Public Radio

More Information
(808) 944-7111, EWCInfo@eastwestcenter.org


May Day in Hawaii

Today in history — May 1, 1902 — Students from Royal School, Kamehameha School, Oahu College (Punahou School), and Kawaiahao Seminary sang for May Day. Boys from Kamehameha School sang Hawaiian melodies with orchestral music, and girls wore white dresses to school.

In Lahaina, Maui, children did the maypole march, raised the flag, and sang.

Read more about it in “The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina.”

“The May Day Concert” and “May Day at Lahaina”
Hawaiian star, May 2, 1902, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1902-05-02/ed-1/seq-7/


Whisky Growing in a Pineapple Field

This month in history — April 1912 — “Pineapple Field Is Found to Grow Splendid Whisky.” At a pineapple field in Wahiawa, a license inspector investigated the blind pigs (illegal alcohol dealers), and a man tried to sell beer to him.

Read more about it in “Pineapple Field Is Found to Grow Splendid Whisky.”

“Pineapple Field Is Found to Grow Splendid Whisky”
Hawaiian gazette, April 12, 1912, Page 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1912-04-12/ed-1/seq-2/


Jules Tavernier: The Volcano Artist

Today in history — April 27, 1844 — Hawaiian volcano artist Jules Tavernier was born in Paris, France. Although he lived only his final five years in Hawaii, Tavernier painted as the most significant artist in Hawaii’s Volcano School (non-native Hawaiian artists who painted night scenes of Hawaii’s erupting volcanoes).
Beyond the jagged cliffs of Kilauea Volcano, the Halemaumau lava lake’s orange red glow illuminates the night (left image). Above, smoke shrouds the lake, and a full moon peeks behind grayish black clouds.

To paint this picture, in 1887, Jules Tavernier (1844-1889) made a grueling one-to-two day journey on horseback up to Kilauea’s peak.

Although the English French artist spent less than five years in Hawaii, Tavernier is considered the most significant artist in Hawaii’s Volcano School … Read more

Jules Tavernier: The Volcano Artist
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/jules-tavernier-the-volcano-artist/


Earthy Poems for an Earthly Day

Love the earth through poetry!

The Tree Planter

He who plants a tree,
He plants love;
Tents of coolness spreading out
Above.

Heaven and earth help him
who plants a tree.
And his work its own reward shall be.

Cultivate your earthly love with more wooden poetry: “Who Plants a Tree.”

“Who Plants a Tree”
The Jasper news, April 28, 1921, Image 9
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90061052/1921-04-28/ed-1/seq-9/


Sinking of the Titanic

Today in history — April 15, 1912 — “Iceberg straight ahead!”, exclaimed a sailor on the RMS Titanic, the infamous cruise ship. Regardless of whether the quote from the movie Titanic was actually said, the sailors on the real RMS Titanic did spot an iceberg while sailing on the North Atlantic Ocean at 11:40 p.m.

Ironically, had the ship continued its course and hit the iceberg, the ship would have stayed afloat. However, the sailors instead tried to dodge the iceberg by turning the ship. But because it was sailing too quickly, the ship hit the iceberg, its fatal blow.

The more-than-2,000 passengers felt the “thud,” which made coffee and tea in the dining halls spill on tablecloths, stain women’s dresses, and interrupted conversations. However, the sailors did not alert the passengers. Feeling safe, they continued to enjoy their parties and went to bed after.

However, hours later, the passengers woke up to a sinking ship filling with water. To save themselves, they wore life vests, ran, swam for their lives in freezing seawater, and evacuated into lifeboats while hearing the calm, soothing music of a string quartet.

But the British passenger liner did not have enough lifeboats because planners thought the ship was too strong to sink. And after the ship sank, many of the lifeboats still had room for more passengers, but alas, the ship was not evacuated early enough. Thus, more than 1,300 people died early April 15, 1912. Read more about one of the worst maritime disasters of history in “Sinking of the Titanic”!

“Sinking of the Titanic”
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/titanicsinking.html