The Judd Building

Judd Building in downtown Honolulu

Today in history — March 20, 1899 — The Judd Building opens in downtown Honolulu for a public reception. One year later, Alexander & Baldwin incorporated, and the building would become its main office. The building still houses businesses today. Read more about the opening in “Judd Building Reception.”

“Judd Building Reception: Opportunity for Seeing the Interior and Riding Skyward”
Evening bulletin., March 22, 1899, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1899-03-22/ed-1/seq-3/

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Princess Kaiulani’s Funeral

Today in history — March 12, 1899 — thousands of people visited Princess Kaiulani’s body in Kawaiahao Church to see her one last time. After the funeral service, a procession went from King Street to the Mausoleum, and 25,000 people watched the hearse surrounded by carriages pass by. Military men, clergies, pall bearers, kahili bearers, and torch bearers followed. In the Royal Mausoleum, Princess Kaiulani was laid to rest with her mother Princess Likelike.

Read more about it in “Princess Kaiulani Is Laid to Rest.”

“Princess Kaiulani Is Laid to Rest”
The Hawaiian star, March 13, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1899-03-13/ed-1/seq-1/


Prince Albert Kunuiakea Died

Today in history — March 10, 1903 — Kamehameha III’s son, Prince Albert Kunuiakea, died in a house. His body was interred at the Royal Mausoleum in Nuuanu with the Kamehameha family. Considered the heir presumptive, Kunuiakea served in the House of Representatives of Hawaii during the Provisional Government’s rule. Read more about it in “Prince Kunuiakea Joins the Majority.”

“Prince Kunuiakea Joins the Majority: Last of the Kamehameha Heirs to Hawaii’s Throne Will Be Buried Sunday in the Royal Mausoleum in Nuuanu”
The Hawaiian gazette, March 13, 1903, Page 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1903-03-13/ed-1/seq-2/


Princess Kaiulani’s Death

Today in history — March 6, 1899 — Princess Kaiulani died at age 23 in her Ainahau home. Sadness enclosed Hawaii. Many spoke of Kaiulani as gentle, generous, gracious, and unassuming. A stream of carriages visited her home, and family and friends mourned with her father Archibald Scott Cleghorn and brought flowers. Government building flags flew half-mast. Read more about it in “Day of Sorrow.”

“Day of Sorrow: All Grieved to Learn of Kaiulani’s Death”
Pacific commercial advertiser, March 7, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1899-03-07/ed-1/seq-1/


Shipwreck Landing at Niihau

Today in history — February 26, 1896 — A schooner from San Francisco got shipwrecked on the reefs of the French Frigate Shoals, an atoll northwest of the Hawaiian islands. The crew evacuated into four boats with five to six men each, and the first one landed on Niihau and encountered people:

The captain and one of the men went over towards a beachhouse … on the beach near … the landing and found a native woman in the boat-house, who got quite astonished at seeing the two white men. They tried to talk to the woman but she did not understand a single word of English. Her husband, who was fishing, … turned up … but … he did not understand any English either…

Read more about it in “Ship Wrecked Sealers.”

“Ship Wrecked Sealers”
Evening bulletin, March 2, 1896, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1896-03-02/ed-1/seq-1/


The Lanai Earthquake

Today in history — February 19, 1871 — The Lanai Earthquake rocked Hawaii with a magnitude of 6.8 at 10:11 p.m. This earthquake caused the most damage to buildings of all recorded Hawaii earthquakes. An “attentive” correspondent wrote about experiencing the earthquake:

“[The earthquake] commenced with a dull roaring noise, accompanied by a violent rocking of the earth, increasing to a louder roar and a lively rattle of things generally, and finally subsided with a low rumbling sound. … my house was fearfully shaken. The vibrations were from south to north.

Read more about the earthquake’s effects in “The Earthquake on Molokai.”

“The Earthquake on Molokai”
The Pacific commercial advertiser., March 04, 1871, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1871-03-04/ed-1/seq-3/


Valentine’s Day in 1916

Valentine’s Day in 1916 meant afternoon and evening parties in Honolulu. Read about it in “Many Valentine Parties in Celebration of Happy Day.”

“Many Valentine Parties in Celebration of Happy Day”
Honolulu star-bulletin, February 14, 1916, SPORTS, CLASSIFIED AND SHIPPING, Page 12, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1916-02-14/ed-3/seq-4/