4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911

In the early 1900s, the Fourth of July could be a dangerous holiday. The American Medical Association cited 1,531 deaths on this Independence Day holiday between 1903 and 1910 from fireworks and other accidents. More than 5,000 injuries were reported in 1909 alone.

Because social groups and U.S. President Taft pled for a “Sane Fourth,” the holiday became safer. However, the Fourth of July today still sees firework injuries and threatening fires, which keeps police officers and firefighters busy. Read more about about it in 4th of July Celebrations, 1876-1911.

4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/4july.html


A Bicycle Seat Saves the Day!

A three-year-old boy fell 20 feet from a balcony, lands on his head, and walked away with only a bruise thanks to a bicycle seat? Read more about it in “Bicycle Seat Saves Tiny Lad.”

“Bicycle Seat Saves Tiny Lad”
Evening bulletin, October 25, 1911, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1911-10-25/ed-1/seq-3/


King Kamehameha IV Marries Emma Rooke

Today in history–June 19, 1856–King Kamehameha IV married Emma Rooke. In a ceremony conducted in both Hawaiian and English, they exchanged their vows in front of 3,000 people and did something different:

“The kneeling of the royal bridegroom and his bride before the altar and exchanging their vows before the audience was so different from the simple custom usually observed here in marriage…”

Read more about this wedding in the article “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/


Automobile News

Horses, carriages, and bicycles ruled the dirt roads in Honolulu before 1899. On October 8, 1899, people watched Henry P. Baldwin and Edward D. Tenney drive Hawaii’s first “horseless car” around town. In 1906, Hawaii issued its first driver’s license.

Afterwards, automobile sections appeared in Hawaii newspapers. They included automobile news, such as automobile sales, automobile races, lists of motor vehicle registrations and new automobile models, and automobile ads. Read more.


The Conversion of Iolani Palace to a Government Building

This week in history — June 1893 — the Provisional Government converted Iolani Palace from a Hawaiian royalty residence to a government building.

A few months after the overthrow, Iolani Palace was now called the “Executive Building” for the Republic of Hawaii. Government offices moved in, redesigned the interior, and auctioned off the furniture and furnishings:

The old carved table upon which the bodies of the Kamehamehas were laid out after death was seen standing in the walk on the Ewa side of the building. It was tabu to the natives around the premises, and none of them would go near it or touch it. They did not seem to have the same fear of the tabu lately laid upon ‘the ex-queen’s palace’ by the kahunas to keep the haoles out …

Read more about it in “At the Capitol.”

The Hawaiian gazette, June 6, 1893, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1893-06-06/ed-1/seq-3/


Digitized Hawaii Japanese Newspapers

Nippu Jiji Masthead

From Dore Minatodani:

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University digitized hoji shinbun, Japanese newspapers published outside of Japan. In this case, the newspapers are from Hawaii, Washington state, and California. Most of the papers are available to all, but some are restricted to Stanford users only.

Hawaii papers available to all:

Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun / 布哇植民新聞 [The Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun], (Hilo, HI)
Hawaii Times / 布哇タイムス, (Honolulu, HI)
Nippu Jiji / 日布時事 [The Nippu Jiji], (Honolulu, HI)

Hawaii papers restricted to Stanford users:

Hawaii Herald, (Honolulu, HI)
Hawaii Hōchi / ハワイ報知 [The Hawaii Hochi], (Honolulu, HI)

http://hojishinbun.hoover.org/

Mahalo to Dore for letting us know!

Hawaii Hōchi Masthead