Sinking of the Titanic

Today in history — April 15, 1912 — “Iceberg straight ahead!”, exclaimed a sailor on the RMS Titanic, the infamous cruise ship. Regardless of whether the quote from the movie Titanic was actually said, the sailors on the real RMS Titanic did spot an iceberg while sailing on the North Atlantic Ocean at 11:40 p.m.

Ironically, had the ship continued its course and hit the iceberg, the ship would have stayed afloat. However, the sailors instead tried to dodge the iceberg by turning the ship. But because it was sailing too quickly, the ship hit the iceberg, its fatal blow.

The more-than-2,000 passengers felt the “thud,” which made coffee and tea in the dining halls spill on tablecloths, stain women’s dresses, and interrupted conversations. However, the sailors did not alert the passengers. Feeling safe, they continued to enjoy their parties and went to bed after.

However, hours later, the passengers woke up to a sinking ship filling with water. To save themselves, they wore life vests, ran, swam for their lives in freezing seawater, and evacuated into lifeboats while hearing the calm, soothing music of a string quartet.

But the British passenger liner did not have enough lifeboats because planners thought the ship was too strong to sink. And after the ship sank, many of the lifeboats still had room for more passengers, but alas, the ship was not evacuated early enough. Thus, more than 1,300 people died early April 15, 1912. Read more about one of the worst maritime disasters of history in “Sinking of the Titanic”!

“Sinking of the Titanic”
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/titanicsinking.html


The Transition to Digital Journalism Workshop

The Transition to Digital JournalismThe Transition to Digital Journalism 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Seminar Room, Sullivan Center for Innovation and Learning, Iolani School
563 Kamoku Street, Honolulu, HI 96826

Guest speaker: Gabe Johnson
senior video journalist and senior producer, The Wall Street Journal 
former editor and senior video journalist, The New York Times

Digital technology is altering the way journalists are doing their jobs — from producing video and slideshows, to capturing stories on mobile devices and using them to interact on social and media networks. Gabe will address the rapidly changing field of journalism as it faces a future that is increasingly viewed on a screen rather than in print, and share his views and expertise on today’s array of digital technologies.

Our time together with Gabe Johnson will include these topics:

  • understanding today’s digital technologies, and why and how to use them
  • identifying newsworthy stories
  • exploring methods of capturing stories using digital media
  • tackling the challenging process of fact-checking
  • Q & A with Gabe

Event includes light pupus and refreshments

TO REGISTER for this FREE workshop, RSVP by Monday, April 17, 2017: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-transition-to-digital-journalism-tickets-33238010785?aff=es2

For more information about the event, please contact Laurie Chang, `Iolani School Newsroom adviser, at lchang@iolani.org

Links to Gabe’s website and some of his works:

Website: http://cargocollective.com/gabejohnson

Trump and the Russian Hacks: a Timeline  http://on.wsj.com/2jkMZjn

An example of what you can do without ever leaving your desk. 7 min.

Tainted Meat: the Sickening of Stephanie Smith

https://www.nytimes.com/video/health/1247464978948/tainted-meat.html

Part of Pulitzer prize-winning project. 10 min

 


Vietnam War through the Eyes of Hawaii’s Journalists

Hawaii journalists Bob Jones and Denby Fawcett covered Vietnam War for The Honolulu Advertiser, and now you can see what they saw:

“Vietnam: The War and the People,” photography exhibition
Lama Library, Kapiolani Community College
Library Hours: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday to 4 p.m.


Pau Hana for Hawaii’s Sugar King

This week in history  — December 26, 1908 — Hawaii’s “sugar king,” Claus Spreckels, died after a brief illness. As one of the ten richest Americans, Spreckels dominated the sugar industries on the U.S. West Coast and in Hawaii from mid-1800s until his death. In Hawaii, he owned a plantation town, Spreckelsville, Maui; and incorporated Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC&S).

Today, the name “Matson” is synonymous with Hawaii’s shipping industry–a lifeline for the world’s most isolated population center. In its early years, Spreckels financed William Matson’s ships for his new shipping company.

Spreckels gave loans and bribes to King Kalakaua and cabinet members. In return, Spreckels got land and water rights. The water rights for the Northeast Maui streams included complete ownership and control over the water. He irrigated the water to Spreckelsville plantation.

Read more about the “sugar king” in “Hardy Pioneer and Benefactor of State Died.”

“Hardy Pioneer and Benefactor of State Died”
The San Francisco call, Dec. 27, 1908, Page 18
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1908-12-27/ed-1/seq-18/


Native Hawaiians Protested U.S. Annexation of Hawaii

Today in history — September 11, 1897 — Native Hawaiians initiated a petition drive against the U.S. annexation of Hawaii. Through October 2, 1897, 21,269 native Hawaiians, or the majority of the 39,000 on the census, signed the “Petition Against Annexation.”

Read more about it in Native Hawaiians Petition Against U.S. Annexation.

Native Hawaiians Petition Against U.S. Annexation
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/native-hawaiians-petition-against-u-s-annexation-2/


Chronicling America Will Expand to 1690-1963 Newspapers

Chronicling America will expand its date scope from 1836-1922 to 1690-1963, and newspaper pages with these dates will be included.

Chronicling America will not offer Hawaii newspaper pages before 1836 or after 1963 in the near future, but eventually may do so contingent on funding (donations can be made here).

The University of Hawaii at Manoa Library offers additional Hawaii newspaper titles online at eVols and ScholarSpace, UH Manoa’s institutional repositories. Hawaii newspaper categories include community/alternative, Filipino-language, Portuguese-language, and English-language (mirroring the Chronicling America collection). Titles include Roach, Ka Leo O Hawaii, and Hawaii Mainichi.

Anything published before 1923 is in the public domain. From 1923 to 1963, materials fell into the public domain if their publishers did not renew their copyrights.

Chronicling America is produced by the National Digital Newspaper Program, a partnership between National Endowment for the Humanities, the Library of Congress, thirty-nine state partners, and one territorial partner.  Over 11 million newspaper pages are freely available to the public.

For more information, read “Expanding Our Current Scope.”

Expanding Our Current Scope
http://www.neh.gov/news/expanding-our-current-scope-ndnp


U.S. President Zachary Taylor Died

This month in history–July 9, 1850–U.S. President Zachary Taylor died of a stomach-related illness. The Southern Press (Washington, DC) described the former major general: “His splendid military achievements won the admiration of his countrymen,– his simplicity of character a large measure of their confidence.”

Read more about the twelfth U.S. President in “Death of President Taylor.”

“Death of President Taylor”
The Southern press, July 10, 1850, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014764/1850-07-10/ed-1/seq-2/