Dowager Queen Emma Rooke’s Death

One hundred and thirty years ago, Dowager Queen Emma Rooke would die in her Honolulu home. After suffering from headaches and convulsions, Emma would die while reclining on her sofa, attended by her friend Miss Peabody. Read more about it in “Departed: Death of Dowager Queen Emma.”

“Departed: Death of Dowager Queen Emma”
The Pacific commercial advertiser., April 27, 1885, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1885-04-27/ed-1/seq-2/


Kuoomauna, the Guard of the Mountains

Kuoomauna, the guard of the mountains, sits on top of one of the highest peaks of Hawaii island. A royal Hawaiian head-dress crowns his head, as he observes the scenery below: scattered rocks, green forests, villages, plantations, and the surrounding tropical fauna.

With its human-like figure, Kuoomauna’s mountain watched as the ancient Hawaiians worshipped it. They approached the mountain only after performing mystic rites and ceremonies and bringing offerings of berries and Pele grass.

Read more about Kuoomauna in “By Mysterious Ways Native Hawaiians Predict Volcanic Eruptions.”

“By Mysterious Ways Native Hawaiians Predict Volcanic Eruptions”

The San Francisco call., August 06, 1899, Page 29, Image 29

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1899-08-06/ed-1/seq-29/


President Lincoln’s Assassination

Today in history — April 15, 1865 — President Abraham Lincoln is shot by John Wilkes Booth during a special performance at Ford’s Theater. A nine-car funeral train carries the body of the President to Springfield, Illinois, where he is buried on May 4th.

Although many of the co-conspirators in this large are captured, John Wilkes Booth is shot after being traced to a farm in Bowling Green, VA on April 24th. The other co-conspirators in the assassination plots on President Lincoln, Secretary Seward, and Vice President Johnson are later tried and convicted by an army military commission.

Read more about it in the Lincoln Assassination Topic Guide.

Lincoln Assassination Topic Guide
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/lincoln.html


Automobile Ads

Before 1899, horses, carriages, and bicycles ruled the dirt roads in Honolulu. On October 8, 1899, people watched Henry P. Baldwin and Edward D. Tenney drive Hawaii’s first “horseless car” around town.

Hawaii car dealers advertised in Hawaii newspapers ever since. Earliest brands included Ford and Locomobile. Plus, Schuman Carriage served as one of Hawaii’s earliest automobile dealers.

View these automobile ads in our Flickr Collection:

Automobile Ads on Flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/uhmlibrary/sets/72157633940182445/


Easter Sunday in Honolulu

Today in history — Easter Sunday in 1913 — churches in Honolulu celebrated Easter with special Easter sermons, Easter lillies, and Easter eggs. Read more about it in Honolulu Star-Advertiser’s special Easter spread.

“Spirit of Easter in All the Churches”
Honolulu star-bulletin., March 22, 1913, 3:30 Edition, Image 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-03-22/ed-1/seq-8/


April Fools’ Day

“The first of April some do say, Was set apart for All Fools’ Day: But why the people call it so, Nor I nor they themselves do know” begins the article in the San Francisco Call on April 1, 1900, which discusses the history and customs of “April Fool’s Day,” also known as “All Fools’ Day.” Read more about it in this April Fools’ Day topic guide.

April Fools’ Day Topic Guide
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/aprilfool.html


Christian Missionaries in Hawaii

This week in history — March 30, 1820 — Fourteen Christian missionaries arrived in Hawaii after traveling for 164 days through the continental United States and the Pacific Ocean. Their ship  landed at Kawaihae and Kailua-Kona, Big Island. Read more about it in “Christian Missionaries in Hawaii.”

Christian Missionaries in Hawaii
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/christian-missionaries-in-hawaii/


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