Marriage of Liliuokalani & John Dominis

Second couple from left: Lydia Paki, future Queen Liliuokalani, and John O. Dominis

Today in history — September 16, 1862 — Miss Lydia K. Paki, the future Queen Liliuokalani, married John O. Dominis:

Married — Dominis–Paki — In Honolulu, Tuesday evening, Sept. 16, at the residence of Chas. R. Bishop, Esq., by Rev. S. C. Damon, John O. Dominis, Esq., to Miss Lydia K. Paki.

Liliuokalani’s wedding
Pacific commercial advertiser, September 18, 1862, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1862-09-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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A Kahili

A feathered standard, a kahili marked Hawaiian royalty.

In 1902, Jas. W. L. McGuire bought a kahili handle from a Hawaiian woman from Maui. The kahili was made of whale bone. The woman claimed that she found it in a cave, and that the kahili handle might be over two to three centuries old.

Read more about the kahili in “Double Kahili Handle.”

“Double Kahili Handle”
The Independent, February 14, 1902, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047097/1902-02-14/ed-1/seq-2/


Hawaii’s First Dog Show

Today in history — September 6, 1906 — 105 dogs competed in Hawaii’s first dog show.  “The town is certainly going to the dogs,” said The Hawaiian Gazette.

“Almost every breed of dog, preserved for use or ornament,” were seen trotting at the dog show at the skating rink on Queen’s Street and ranged from toy dogs, including the only Blenheim spaniel in Hawaii, to guard dogs, including the Great Dane. However, no native poi dogs were seen–virtually all of the dog owners there were Haole (Caucasian) with European and Asian dogs, such as collies, fox-terriers, and the Japanese Spaniel.

The most interesting category–“Best dog or bitch owned by a lady”–reflected the less-negative connotation of the term “bitch” (female dog) back then.

Read more about Hawaii’s first dog show in “Dog Show’s Bright Opening.”

“Dog Show’s Bright Opening”
Hawaiian gazette, September 7, 1906, Page 5
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1906-09-07/ed-1/seq-5/


Prince Consort John Dominis’ Death

Today in history — August 27, 1891 —  the husband of Queen Liliuokalani, John Dominis died. Read more about the Royal Governor of Oahu and Prince Consort in “A Second Sorrow.”

“A Second Sorrow: Death of His Royal Highness the Prince Consort”
The Daily bulletin, August 28, 1891, Image 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1891-08-28/ed-1/seq-3/


Duke Kahanamoku’s Birthday

Happy birthday Duke Paoa Kahanamoku! Today in history — August 24, 1890 — the future first Native Hawaiian gold medalist was born.

As a grown up, Kahanamoku broke the world record in swimming and popularized surfing in mainland United States and Australia.

Read more about him in “Duke Kahanamoku in U.S. Newspapers.”

Duke Kahanamoku in U.S. Newspapers
https://hdnpblog.wordpress.com/historical-articles/duke-kahanamoku-in-u-s-newspapers/


Champagne Served in Duke Kahanamoku’s Trophy

This month in history — August 1913 — Duke Kahanamoku‘s friends drank champagne from his trophy. Aboard a ship, they drank for the health of the five-time Olympic medalist in swimming.

Read more about it in “Loving Cup Used for Wine Bowl.”

“Loving Cup Used for Wine Bowl: Duke Kahanamoku’s Trophy is Utilized by Colonel Parker for Purpose Designed” (first column on the right, second story)
The San Francisco call, August 13, 1913, Image 4
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1913-08-13/ed-1/seq-4/


Losing a Kingdom

Today in history — August 12, 1898 — people gathered at Iolani Palace to celebrate the “U.S. annexation” of Hawaii. U.S. troops came ashore from Honolulu Harbor. But Queen Lili’uokalani was nowhere to be seen.

Instead, dressed in black in the Washington Place mansion, she and her family members and loyalists mourned losing their Kingdom, as she explained to newspaper reporter Alice Rix in an interview:

Alice Rix: “I thought perhaps you would go away—into the country.”

Queen Lili’uokalani: “Why? I came here to be near my people—to show them how to meet this. It has come upon us together—you understand? Together. I am not alone. My people lose their country; they lose their identity. Should I run away and shut my eyes and my ears when so many of them had to remain here in their homes? My home is also here, in Honolulu [Washington Place]. It gives us all courage to think of others. I remembered my people this day and they remembered me. We bore our trouble together. I did not leave my house….”

Read more about it in “How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”

“How the Ex-queen Passed the Twelfth of August.”
The San Francisco call, August 28, 1898, Image 17
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1898-08-28/ed-1/seq-17/