Liliuokalani Hosting a Reception in Washington, D.C.

This month in history —  July 1902 — Liliuokalani hosted a musicale and reception at the Ebbitt House in Washington, D.C. Guests included representatives and senators. Large palms and flowers decorated the rooms, and the orchestra played Hawaiian music.

Read more about this reception in “Music and Song for Her Invited Guests.”

“Music and Song for Her Invited Guests”
Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062245/1902-05-29/ed-1/seq-7/


Alcohol Prohibition in Hawaii

This month in history — July 1910 — voters in Hawaii decided whether Hawaii should start a prohibition on alcohol. Liquor sellers campaigned against the proposal and gave voters rides to the polls. The Hawaiian Gazette said, “The liquor people spent money like water–or booze–to get out their voters.” At every polling site, representatives of liquor interests monitored the votes, pressuring all voters to vote “no.”

Read more about the proposed prohibition in 1910 in “How the Vote Was Brought In.”

“How the Vote Was Brought In”
The Hawaiian gazette, July 29, 1910, Page 7, Image 8
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1910-07-29/ed-1/seq-8/


Queen Kapiolani’s Funeral

This month in history — July 4, 1899 — Queen Kapiolani’s funeral. Flowers and kahili decorated Kawaiahao Church, and it was “crowded to its utmost.” To the organ’s melody, choirs sang solemn funeral selections such as Handel’s Largo.

To read more about the funeral of King Kalakaua’s wife, read “Passing of the Queen Dowager.”

The Hawaiian gazette, July 5, 1899, Image 1
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1899-07-05/ed-1/seq-1/


4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911

In the early 1900s, the Fourth of July could be a dangerous holiday. The American Medical Association cited 1,531 deaths on this Independence Day holiday between 1903 and 1910 from fireworks and other accidents. More than 5,000 injuries were reported in 1909 alone.

Because social groups and U.S. President Taft pled for a “Sane Fourth,” the holiday became safer. However, the Fourth of July today still sees firework injuries and threatening fires, which keeps police officers and firefighters busy. Read more about about it in 4th of July Celebrations, 1876-1911.

4th of July Celebrations 1876-1911
http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/4july.html


A Bicycle Seat Saves the Day!

A three-year-old boy fell 20 feet from a balcony, lands on his head, and walked away with only a bruise thanks to a bicycle seat? Read more about it in “Bicycle Seat Saves Tiny Lad.”

“Bicycle Seat Saves Tiny Lad”
Evening bulletin, October 25, 1911, Page 3
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1911-10-25/ed-1/seq-3/


King Kamehameha IV Marries Emma Rooke

Today in history–June 19, 1856–King Kamehameha IV married Emma Rooke. In a ceremony conducted in both Hawaiian and English, they exchanged their vows in front of 3,000 people and did something different:

“The kneeling of the royal bridegroom and his bride before the altar and exchanging their vows before the audience was so different from the simple custom usually observed here in marriage…”

Read more about this wedding in the article “Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV.”

“Marriage: Of His Majesty Kamehameha IV”
Pacific commercial advertiser, July 2, 1856, Image 2
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1856-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/


Kamehameha Day: Honoring King Kamehameha I

Today, Hawaii celebrates Kamehameha Day, honoring King Kamehameha I. He combined all of the Hawaiian islands under one rule. Read more about his life and memorial statues in “First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii.”

“First and Greatest Chief Ruler in Hawaii”
Hawaiian gazette, August 16, 1898, Page 10
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1898-08-16/ed-1/seq-10/